Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Disturbed Rest-Activity Rhythms Strongly Associated With Mortality Rates In Older Men

Date:
June 11, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary:
Strong associations between disturbed rest/activity rhythms and mortality rates in older, community-dwelling (noninstitutionalized) men have been reported.

A research abstract that will be presented on June 11 at SLEEP 2008, the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS), is the first to report strong associations between disturbed rest/activity rhythms and mortality rates in older, community-dwelling (non-institutionalized) men.

The study, funded by the National Institute on Aging and authored by Misti L. Paudel, of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in Minneapolis, focused on 3,053 community-dwelling men aged 67 years and older. Rest/activity biological rhythms were obtained, and specific measures of these rhythms included the time of the peak of the rest/activity rhythm (acrophase), the height of the rest/activity rhythm (amplitude) and the robustness or strength of the rest/activity rhythm (F-value). Each was expressed as quintiles (i.e., the data were distributed into five equal parts, each containing a fifth of the sample population).

All models were controlled for multiple potential confounders, including age, race, alcohol, health status, impairments in activities of daily living scale, and common medical conditions. The results showed that men with the lowest amplitude (i.e., lowest quintile) had higher mortality rates than men with the highest amplitude (i.e. highest quintile). A similar association was observed between men with less robust rhythms and higher rates of mortality. There was a U-shaped association between mortality rates and timing of peak activity (acrophase), with mortality rates greatest in men with the earliest and latest time of peaks of the rest/activity rhythms (furthest from the mean).

"The association between rest/activity rhythm disruptions and mortality has been studied in cancer patients and older, institutionalized adults with Alzheimer disease," said Paudel. "However, our study is the first to report strong associations between characteristics of rest-activity rhythms and death in older, community-dwelling (non-institutionalized) men. It is uncertain whether the relationship between rest/activity circadian rhythms and mortality in older people is causal, or whether rest/activity circadian rhythms represent a potent biomarker related to increased risk of death. More research is needed in order to understand the physiologic and biological mechanisms underlying these associations, as well as the contribution of poor health."

Not sleeping well can lead to a number of problems. Older adults who have poor nighttime sleep are more likely to have a depressed mood, attention and memory problems, excessive daytime sleepiness, more nighttime falls and use more over-the-counter or prescription sleep aids. In addition, recent studies associate lack of sleep with serious health problems such as an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Disturbed Rest-Activity Rhythms Strongly Associated With Mortality Rates In Older Men." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611071143.htm>.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2008, June 11). Disturbed Rest-Activity Rhythms Strongly Associated With Mortality Rates In Older Men. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611071143.htm
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Disturbed Rest-Activity Rhythms Strongly Associated With Mortality Rates In Older Men." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611071143.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dieting At A Young Age Might Lead To Harmful Health Habits

Dieting At A Young Age Might Lead To Harmful Health Habits

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Researchers say women who diet at a young age are at greater risk of developing harmful health habits, including eating disorders and alcohol abuse. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

It's Not Just Facebook: OKCupid Experiments With Users Too

Newsy (July 29, 2014) If you've been looking for love online, there's a chance somebody has been looking at how you're looking. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

How Your Face Can Leave A Good Or Bad First Impression

Newsy (July 29, 2014) Researchers have found certain facial features can make us seem more attractive or trustworthy. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins