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GLAST Lifts Off On Gamma Ray Mission

Date:
June 11, 2008
Source:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Summary:
NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope successfully launched aboard a Delta II rocket June 11. The spacecraft will study the highest-energy form of light, helping scientists to answer questions about supermassive black hole systems, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

The GLAST spacecraft and Delta II rocket leap off the launch pad.
Credit: NASA TV

NASA's Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope successfully launched aboard a Delta II rocket June 11. The spacecraft will study the highest-energy form of light, helping scientists to answer questions about supermassive black hole systems, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

At 12:05 p.m. EDT, the Delta II rocket easily lifted the GLAST spacecraft off the launch pad, out of smoke and clouds and into a beautiful Florida sky headed for space.

The second firing of the second-stage engine was confirmed as was successful spacecraft separation. Applause rippled through the launch control center as separation confirmation was received.

GLAST is now on its own with its solar arrays deployed and placed into a circular orbit 350 miles above the Earth, prepared to monitor the universe and the mysterious gamma-ray bursts.

GLAST is a powerful space observatory that will explore the most extreme environments in the universe, and search for signs of new laws of physics and what composes the mysterious dark matter, explain how black holes accelerate immense jets of material to nearly light speed, and help crack the mysteries of the staggeringly powerful explosions known as gamma-ray bursts.

With high sensitivity GLAST is the first imaging gamma-ray observatory to survey the entire sky every day. It will give scientists a unique opportunity to learn about the ever-changing universe at extreme energies. GLAST will detect thousands of gamma-ray sources, most of which will be supermassive black holes in the cores of distant galaxies.

GLAST: Exploring the Extreme Universe

GLAST is a powerful space observatory that will open a wide window on the universe. Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, and the gamma-ray sky is spectacularly different from the one we perceive with our own eyes. With a huge leap in all key capabilities, GLAST data will enable scientists to answer persistent questions across a broad range of topics, including supermassive black-hole systems, pulsars, the origin of cosmic rays, and searches for signals of new physics.

The mission is an astrophysics and particle physics partnership, developed by NASA in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy, along with important contributions from academic institutions and partners in France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Sweden, and the U.S.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "GLAST Lifts Off On Gamma Ray Mission." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611143818.htm>.
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (2008, June 11). GLAST Lifts Off On Gamma Ray Mission. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611143818.htm
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. "GLAST Lifts Off On Gamma Ray Mission." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080611143818.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

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