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Coats Of Cellulose From Bacteria Yield Greener, Stronger Natural Composites

Date:
June 20, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Researchers report the first use of bacteria to deposit sticky coatings of cellulose on the surfaces of plant fibers, a process that may expand the use of natural fibers in renewable plastic composites used as strong, lightweight materials for cars, airplanes, and other products.
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Researchers report a new method of depositing bacterial cellulose on plant fibers to enhance durability and strength of composite materials.
Credit: Courtesy of American Chemical Society

Researchers in the United Kingdom report the first use of bacteria to deposit sticky coatings of cellulose on the surfaces of plant fibers, a process that may expand the use of natural fibers in renewable plastic composites used as strong, lightweight materials for cars, airplanes, and other products.

The coated fibers provide strength and will make composites more durable without affecting their biodegradability. They are more suitable for recycling (or compositing) than commonly used petroleum-based composites, the researchers say.

In the new study, Alexander Bismarck and colleagues point out that synthetic composite materials now in use are made from nonrenewable, petroleum sources which are becoming more expensive. These materials not only are difficult to break down, they also create environmental hazards when disposed. Existing composites made from natural fibers show poor adhesion qualities and must be strengthened by using other synthetic coupling agents, some of which are toxic, the researchers note.

The researchers coated hemp and sisal fibers with nano-sized particles of bacterial cellulose through a special fermentation process. The coated sisal fibers showed much better adhesion properties than the original fibers without losing their mechanical properties, ideal properties for their use in composites, the researchers say. The modified hemp fibers also had improved adhesion properties but showed a loss of strength, they note.


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The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alexander Bismarck et al. Surface Modification of Natural Fibers Using Bacteria: Depositing Bacterial Cellulose onto Natural Fibers To Create Hierarchical Fiber Reinforced Nanocomposites. Biomacromolecules, June, 2008 DOI: 10.1021/bm800169g

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Coats Of Cellulose From Bacteria Yield Greener, Stronger Natural Composites." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616091602.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, June 20). Coats Of Cellulose From Bacteria Yield Greener, Stronger Natural Composites. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616091602.htm
American Chemical Society. "Coats Of Cellulose From Bacteria Yield Greener, Stronger Natural Composites." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080616091602.htm (accessed July 31, 2015).

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