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Tick And Mosquito Repellent Can Be Made Commercially From Pine Oil

Date:
June 30, 2008
Source:
USDA/Agricultural Research Service
Summary:
A naturally-occurring compound prepared from pine oil that seems to deter mosquito biting and repels two kinds of ticks has been developed. This newly-discovered repellent can be prepared inexpensively from pine oil feedstock in ton quantities for large-scale commercial applications, giving it a significant advantage over many of the other natural-product repellent chemicals.

ARS chemist Aijun Zhang has discovered that a compound from pine oil is a natural repellent for mosquitoes and ticks.
Credit: Photo courtesy of Aijun Zhang, ARS

A naturally-occurring compound prepared from pine oil that seems to deter mosquito biting and repels two kinds of ticks has been found by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

A patent* was issued on May 27 for the compound, isolongifolenone, and partners are being sought to bring this technology to commercial production.

In laboratory tests, ARS chemist Aijun Zhang in the Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Laboratory, Beltsville, Md., and his colleagues discovered that the naturally occurring compound deters the biting of mosquitoes more effectively than the widely used synthetic chemical repellent DEET. The compound also repelled two kinds of ticks as effectively as DEET.

Insect repellents are used widely to prevent bites from mosquitoes, sand flies, ticks and other arthropods. For the most part, people apply repellents just to avoid discomfort, but there is a more serious side to the use of these products. Human diseases caused by blood-feeding ticks and mosquitoes represent a serious threat to public health worldwide.

Malaria is the chief threat, killing approximately two million people per year and threatening billions. Other diseases include dengue fever, chikungunya, Lyme disease and typhus. Some segments of the public perceive efficient synthetic active ingredients as somehow more dangerous than botanical compounds, giving additional importance to the discovery of plant-based isolongifolenone.

Zhang's team also developed an easy and efficient method to prepare this repellent. Many natural-product chemicals isolated from plants and essential oils have proven to have repellent effects. Most often, such compounds never attain commercial development and their use is limited or impractical because they are expensive and not available in pure and large quantities.

In contrast, this newly-discovered repellent can be prepared inexpensively from pine oil feedstock in ton quantities for large-scale commercial applications, giving it a significant advantage over many of the other natural-product repellent chemicals.

*Patent number: US 7,378,557 B1


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by USDA/Agricultural Research Service. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Tick And Mosquito Repellent Can Be Made Commercially From Pine Oil." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080629080038.htm>.
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. (2008, June 30). Tick And Mosquito Repellent Can Be Made Commercially From Pine Oil. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080629080038.htm
USDA/Agricultural Research Service. "Tick And Mosquito Repellent Can Be Made Commercially From Pine Oil." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080629080038.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

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