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Proteins Could Relate To Increased Longevity In Women

Date:
June 30, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists in Spain and Italy have identified a group of proteins in laboratory rats that could help explain two enduring medical mysteries -- why women live longer than men and why calorie restriction stands as the only proven method of extending longevity.
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Scientists in Spain and Italy have identified a group of proteins in laboratory rats that could help explain two enduring medical mysteries — why women live longer than men and why calorie restriction stands as the only proven method of extending longevity.

Their study, which could help scientists understand the biochemical underpinnings of aging, is scheduled for the July 3 issue of ACS' monthly Journal of Proteome Research.

In the study, Adamo Valle and colleagues point out that women, on average, live years longer than men. Previous studies also have shown that diets extremely low in calories consistently increase maximum life spans in a wide range of animals. Scientists have speculated that the explanation may involve hormones, stress, cardiovascular protection and other factors.

Using lab rats as stand-ins for humans, the researchers found that the livers of both female rats and calorie-restricted rats produced different levels of 27 proteins than male rats or those on a normal diet.

The findings suggest that a previously unrecognized set of cellular pathways may be involved in the longevity boost from being female and eating a sparse diet, the study says, suggesting that these insights could lead to new ways of boosting human longevity.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Valle, Adamo, Silvestri, Elena, Moreno, Maria, Chambery, Angela, Oliver, Jordi, Roca, Pilar, and Goglia, Fernando. Combined Effect of Gender and Caloric Restriction on Liver Proteomic Expression Profile. J. Proteome Res., 2008 DOI: 10.1021/pr800086t

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Proteins Could Relate To Increased Longevity In Women." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080630112050.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, June 30). Proteins Could Relate To Increased Longevity In Women. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080630112050.htm
American Chemical Society. "Proteins Could Relate To Increased Longevity In Women." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080630112050.htm (accessed May 27, 2015).

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