Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Geosequestration: Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Rock To Offset Global Warming

Date:
July 22, 2008
Source:
Queensland University of Technology
Summary:
The same technology used to analyse minerals and atmosphere on Mars and other planets is being used by scientists to explore methods for geosequestration of carbon emissions. The idea of geosequestration is to trap carbon dioxide and to lock it into minerals deep underground. Geosequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the methods under debate to reduce greenhouse gases and their effects on climate change.

The same technology used to analyse minerals and atmosphere on Mars and other planets is being used by scientists from QUT to explore methods for geosequestration of carbon emissions.

Related Articles


Professor Ray Frost, from QUT's School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, said the idea of geosequestration was to trap carbon dioxide and to lock it into minerals deep underground.

Geosequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the methods under debate to reduce greenhouse gases and their effects on climate change.

"The concept of geosequestration involves liquifying carbon dioxide and depositing it into mineral zones below the earth's surface where chemical reactions of the liquid CO2 with minerals stabilise it in solid form," Professor Frost said.

He is using a range of magnesium minerals as models for geosequestration and investigating the extent of their reaction with CO2 and developing the methodology to determine the stability and detection of these minerals.

"One way of detecting and measuring magnesium carbonate minerals is the use of near-infrared spectroscopy which is what scientists used to analyse Mars' minerals and atmosphere," Professor Frost said.

"We are using near-infrared spectroscopy to identify suitable rocks below the earth's surface in which to safely store carbon dioxide."

He said the geosequestration process would involve carbon dioxide being captured from power station stacks and liquefied under pressure.

"Then it would be a matter of pumping it down into rock that has deposits of magnesium minerals in it. The presence of magnesium turns the liquid carbon dioxide into a stable, safe rock - magnesium carbonate.

"Magnesium is very common in a wide range of minerals and it is needed to react with the liquefied CO2 so that it doesn't turn back into gas and escape," he said.

The near infrared spectroscope is being used to identify the materials found underground in order to find suitable magnesium-bearing rocks.

"Capturing and liquefying the carbon dioxide is already possible. We now need to find suitable places to put it in such as old coal mines or depleted oil reservoirs."

Professor Frost said QUT was looking for industry partners for financial support in testing the models for geosequestration.

"I think it will be an inexpensive method and existing power stations could be retrofitted to capture the carbon dioxide."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queensland University of Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Queensland University of Technology. "Geosequestration: Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Rock To Offset Global Warming." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080717210554.htm>.
Queensland University of Technology. (2008, July 22). Geosequestration: Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Rock To Offset Global Warming. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080717210554.htm
Queensland University of Technology. "Geosequestration: Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Rock To Offset Global Warming." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080717210554.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Earth & Climate News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Innovative recycling project in La Paz separates city waste and converts plastic garbage into school furniture made from 'plastiwood'. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers at Northwestern University are repurposing Blu-ray movies for better solar panel technology thanks to the discs' internal structures. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Antarctic Sea Ice Mystery Thickens... Literally

Antarctic Sea Ice Mystery Thickens... Literally

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Antarctic sea ice isn't only expanding, it's thicker than previously thought, and scientists aren't sure exactly why. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

3D Map of Antarctic Sea Ice to Shed Light on Climate Change

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) — A multinational group of scientists have released the first ever detailed, high-resolution 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice. Using an underwater robot equipped with sonar, the researchers mapped the underside of a massive area of sea ice to gauge the impact of climate change. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins