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Water-stingy Agriculture Reduces Arsenic In Rice Markedly

Date:
July 30, 2008
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
A new farming method first developed to conserve precious irrigation water may have the added benefit of producing rice containing much less arsenic than rice grown using traditional rice-farming methods, researchers in the United Kingdom report.

A new farming method first developed to conserve precious irrigation water may have the added benefit of producing rice containing much less arsenic than rice grown using traditional rice-farming methods, researchers in the United Kingdom report.

Their study is scheduled for the August 1 issue of ACS' Environmental Science & Technology, a semi-monthly journal.

In the new study, Fang-Jie Zhao and colleagues point out that rice — a staple crop for 2.5 billion people worldwide — also is a major source of human exposure to arsenic in certain countries. Arsenic has been linked to cancer and other diseases. Arsenic gets in rice in countries such as Bangladesh and India when farmers flood rice paddies with arsenic-contaminated irrigation water.

The scientists compared rice plants grown in "flooded" soil in greenhouse conditions to rice plants grown under aerobic conditions. The other rice contained 10 to 15 times lower arsenic levels than the "flooded" rice, the scientists report.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Xu et al. Growing Rice Aerobically Markedly Decreases Arsenic Accumulation. Environmental Science & Technology, 2008; 0 (0): 0 DOI: 10.1021/es800324u

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Water-stingy Agriculture Reduces Arsenic In Rice Markedly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 July 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080728220411.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2008, July 30). Water-stingy Agriculture Reduces Arsenic In Rice Markedly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080728220411.htm
American Chemical Society. "Water-stingy Agriculture Reduces Arsenic In Rice Markedly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080728220411.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

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