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Carbon Capture Milestone In China

Date:
August 4, 2008
Source:
CSIRO Australia
Summary:
Just weeks out from the Olympics, the CSIRO and its Chinese partners have officially launched a post-combustion capture pilot plant in Beijing that strips carbon dioxide from power station flue gases in an effort to stem climate change.

The post-combustion capture pilot plant at Huaneng Beijing Co-Generation Power Plant is designed to capture 3000 tonnes per annum of carbon dioxide.
Credit: China Huaneng Group

Just weeks out from the Olympics, the CSIRO and its Chinese partners have officially launched a post-combustion capture (PCC) pilot plant in Beijing that strips carbon dioxide from power station flue gases in an effort to stem climate change.

The project represents another first for the CSIRO PCC program - the first capture of carbon dioxide in China using a PCC pilot plant. It begins the process of applying the technology to Chinese conditions and evaluating its effectiveness.

PCC is a process that uses a liquid to capture carbon dioxide from power station flue gases and is a technology that can potentially reduce carbon dioxide emissions from existing and future coal-fired power stations by more than 85 per cent.

The post-combustion research pilot plant at the Huaneng Beijing Co-Generation Power Plant is designed to capture 3000 tonnes per annum of carbon dioxide.

CSIRO’s partners in the Beijing pilot project are China’s Huaneng Group and the Thermal Power Research Institute (TPRI).

Chief of CSIRO’s Energy Technology Division, Dr David Brockway, said the project was part of a broad program to identify ways to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector.

“Given the world’s reliance on coal, we need to find ways to make it a cleaner energy source. We’re delighted to be working with our partners in China to help find solutions to this global challenge,” Dr Brockway said.

“In a recent visit to China, Prime Minister Kevin Rudd said that China was the largest consumer of coal in the world and Australia was the world’s largest exporter of coal. As such, Australia and China should work together develop low emissions coal technologies.”

The PCC project will focus on assessing the performance of an amine-based pilot plant under Chinese conditions.

“It will allow PCC technology to be progressed in the Chinese energy sector which will have a much greater impact than operating in Australia alone,” Dr Brockway said.

“The next steps in the research would be moving to a much larger demonstration phase, before then progressing to a full scale system.”

The installation of the PCC pilot plant in Beijing is a CSIRO Energy Transformed Flagship research project which receives funding from the Australian Government through the Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate initiative (APP). The APP program for PCC also includes a pilot plant installation at Delta Electricity’s Munmorah power station on the NSW Central Coast, with an additional Queensland site currently under negotiation.

The Australian Government's APP support PCC research is A$12 million, A$4 million of which supports this work in China.

CSIRO is also undertaking PCC research outside the scope of the APP program with a A$5.6 million project in the Latrobe Valley, which focuses on brown coal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by CSIRO Australia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

CSIRO Australia. "Carbon Capture Milestone In China." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080731135924.htm>.
CSIRO Australia. (2008, August 4). Carbon Capture Milestone In China. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080731135924.htm
CSIRO Australia. "Carbon Capture Milestone In China." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080731135924.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

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