Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Surgical Weight Loss Does Not Eliminate Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Date:
August 16, 2008
Source:
American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Summary:
A study in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine shows that surgical weight loss results in an improvement of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but most patients continue to have moderate to severe OSA one year after undergoing bariatric surgery. Results of this study suggest that it is the severity of the condition, rather than a patient's presurgical weight, that determines if OSA will be resolved.

Surgical weight loss results in an improvement of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but most patients continue to have moderate to severe OSA one year after undergoing bariatric surgery according to new research. Results of the study suggest that it is the severity of the condition, rather than a patient's presurgical weight, that determines if OSA will be resolved.

Results show that bariatric surgery reduced body mass index (BMI) from an average of 51 to 32 in 24 adults with OSA. At the one-year follow-up, however, only one participant (4 percent) experienced a resolution of OSA, and the majority of the study group (71 percent) still had moderate to severe OSA. Patients who have residual OSA after surgery are encouraged to maintain ongoing treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy.

The prevalence of OSA among obese individuals is high and correlates with increasing BMI; among the severely obese, the prevalence of OSA ranges from 55 percent to 90 percent. OSA itself may promote weight gain through ineffective sleep, impaired glucose metabolism and imbalances of leptin, ghrelin and orexin levels.

"We were surprised by the severity of the residual sleep apnea in postoperative patients," said principal investigator Christopher J. Lettieri, MD, Chief of Sleep Medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. "The majority of individuals still had moderate to severe OSA."

"The second surprising finding of this study was that despite the persistence and severity of the disease, most people thought their sleep apnea was resolved after their weight loss and only a few still used CPAP," he said.

According to Lettieri, weight loss has many overall benefits; however, most people should not assume their OSA will be resolved after they have lost weight. The baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), a measure used to identify the presence of OSA and define its severity, is the most important determinant of whether or not an individual will be cured of the disease. Individuals with a lower AHI may experience complete resolution of their OSA.

Twenty-four consecutive patients referred to the Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine Service for preoperative evaluation of excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) prior to bariatric surgery were included in the study. Patients on average were 47.9 years, and most (75 percent) were women. Each was assessed by overnight polysomnography prior to and one year after undergoing bariatric surgery.

Postoperative polysomnography revealed reductions in the AHI in 22 subjects. Of the 12 patients whose AHI improved sufficiently to reclassify their OSA severity, three (12.5 percent) improved by more than one category of severity. Twenty-three patients had persistent OSA at follow-up. One patient had AHI less than five and no longer met the criteria for a diagnosis of OSA.

Although only seven patients (29 percent) subjectively complained of snoring postoperatively, all but one (96 percent) snored during the follow-up polysomnography. Significant improvements were noted on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (EES); however, nearly half reported a persistence of daytime somnolence and more than half (54 percent) continued to have ESS scores greater than 10.

The authors of this study note that patients and physicians need to recognize that the subjective resolution of snoring after surgical weight loss does not equate to improvements or cure of OSA.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Persistence of Obstructive Sleep Apnea After Surgical Weight Loss. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, August 15, 2008

Cite This Page:

American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Surgical Weight Loss Does Not Eliminate Obstructive Sleep Apnea." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 August 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080815072142.htm>.
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. (2008, August 16). Surgical Weight Loss Does Not Eliminate Obstructive Sleep Apnea. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080815072142.htm
American Academy of Sleep Medicine. "Surgical Weight Loss Does Not Eliminate Obstructive Sleep Apnea." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/08/080815072142.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins