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Thin Men More Vulnerable To Osteoporosis And Bone Fractures Than Other Older Men

Date:
September 20, 2008
Source:
Norwegian Institute of Public Health
Summary:
Obesity and weight increase leads to an increased risk of many chronic diseases, and the advice is therefore to maintain a stable healthy weight. Now, research shows that there may be disadvantages to being thin. Men who have low weight in middle age and who reduce their weight, increase the chance of osteoporosis and fracture. The findings are now published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
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FULL STORY

Obesity and weight increase leads to an increased risk of many chronic diseases, and the advice is therefore to maintain a stable healthy weight. Now, research shows that there may be disadvantages to being thin.

Men who have low weight in middle age and who reduce their weight, increase the chance of osteoporosis and fracture. This is shown in data from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and the University of Tromsø.

Low weight leads to increased risk of osteoporosis

"Low weight among middle-aged men was related to the risk of osteoporosis three decades later, and this risk was significantly affected by weight changes. Weight increase reduced the risk, whereas weight loss increased the risk," says Professor Haakon E. Meyer at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and the University of Oslo.

1 476 men who participated in the Oslo survey in 1972-73 and the Tromsø survey in 1974-75 were again studied for, among other things, osteoporosis in the Health Studies in Oslo 2000-01 and Tromsø 2001 respectively.

This survey shows that low weight among middle-aged men and subsequent weight loss leads to increased risk of osteoporosis when the men become older. Almost a third had osteoporosis among the thinnest quarter of men in the 1970s and who later lost weight. In contrast, of the quarter that had the highest weight in the 1970s and had not changed their weight, none of the men had osteoporosis.

A stable and healthy weight is recommended

Although weight increase and a high weight are beneficial for the skeleton, a stable, healthy weight is still recommended according to Meyer.

"With respect to weight loss, however, the impact on osteoporosis and fracture should be taken into account and, if possible, prevented," he says.

The study is a collaboration between the University of Oslo, University of Tromsø and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Meyer et al. Weight Change over Three Decades and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Men: The Norwegian Epidemiological Osteoporosis Studies (NOREPOS). American Journal of Epidemiology, 2008; 168 (4): 454 DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwn151

Cite This Page:

Norwegian Institute of Public Health. "Thin Men More Vulnerable To Osteoporosis And Bone Fractures Than Other Older Men." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080918101526.htm>.
Norwegian Institute of Public Health. (2008, September 20). Thin Men More Vulnerable To Osteoporosis And Bone Fractures Than Other Older Men. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 4, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080918101526.htm
Norwegian Institute of Public Health. "Thin Men More Vulnerable To Osteoporosis And Bone Fractures Than Other Older Men." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080918101526.htm (accessed May 4, 2015).

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