Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Low Sensitivity Of Clinical Genomic Signatures

Date:
September 24, 2008
Source:
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials
Summary:
Genomic signature sequences used by clinical researchers to detect, quantify and diagnose nucleic acid sequences are not inclusive enough. New research shows that many published sequences are of unacceptably low sensitivity for most clinical applications.

Genomic signature sequences used by clinical researchers to detect, quantify and diagnose nucleic acid sequences are not inclusive enough. New research shows that many published sequences are of unacceptably low sensitivity for most clinical applications.

According to Shea Gardner of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, lead author of the study, "In recent years, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has become a leading technique for nucleic acid detection and quantification. In our analysis of the RT-PCR signatures described in recent literature, we found that many published sequences have a high specificity but only a very low sensitivity".

Gardner and co-author, Gordon Lemmon, suggest that a rigorous approach involving false positive and false negative analysis should be the standard by which an initial assessment of signature quality is made. They write, "Signatures must be reassessed as new sequence data becomes available. For targets with wide nucleotide diversity, such as influenza viruses, it is necessary to develop a set of signatures with a minimal set clustering approach that may also include signatures with degenerate/inosine bases".

Gardner comments, "The rapidly growing availability of sequence data for pathogens from across the globe means that we can better predict how robustly a signature will detect all the intended targets. Using a computational approach to design and pre-screen signatures can improve the quality of sequence-based diagnostics and save time and money in lab testing".


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gordon H Lemmon and Shea N Gardner. Predicting the sensitivity and specificity of published real-time PCR assays. Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, (in press)

Cite This Page:

Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. "Low Sensitivity Of Clinical Genomic Signatures." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080924192441.htm>.
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. (2008, September 24). Low Sensitivity Of Clinical Genomic Signatures. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080924192441.htm
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials. "Low Sensitivity Of Clinical Genomic Signatures." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080924192441.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Is Apathy A Sign Of A Shrinking Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A recent study links apathetic feelings to a smaller brain. Researchers say the results indicate a need for apathy screening for at-risk seniors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) A research institute in Paris somehow misplaced more than 2,000 vials of the deadly SARS virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins