Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Community-based Behavior Change Management Cuts Neonatal Mortality In Half

Date:
September 30, 2008
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health
Summary:
A community-based program that reinforces basic childbirth and newborn care practices can reduce a baby's risk of death within the first month of life by as much as 54 percent, according to a new study.

A community-based program that reinforces basic childbirth and newborn care practices can reduce a baby's risk of death within the first month of life by as much as 54 percent, according to a study in rural India led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in collaboration with CSM Medical University in Lucknow, India.

Related Articles


"Changes in behavior such as preparing for the birth and skin-to-skin care to keep the baby warm, breastfeeding and infection prevention practices were found to significantly reduce neonatal mortality," said Gary Dramstadt, MD, the senior author and principal investigator of the study, who led the research while at the Bloomberg School of Public Health but is now Senior Program Officer for Neonatal Health with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

"This was a unique experiment that tested a delivery model of preventive practices co-developed with community members. This was essentially a community-driven program that aimed to empower them to save the lives of their own babies," added Vishwajeet Kumar, MBBS, a researcher with the Bloomberg School's Department of International Health and first author and co-principal investigator of the study.

The randomized trial was conducted in Uttar Pradesh state, where 25 percent of India's 1 million annual neonate deaths occur. More than 80 percent of infant deliveries took place in the home and away from the formal health care system. As part of the study, the researchers worked with community members to develop simple, culturally relevant messages to reinforce healthy birth preparedness and clean delivery, hygienic umbilical cord care, skin-to-skin care (holding the baby close against the mother's chest), breastfeeding and keeping the baby warm.

Community health workers, with support from community volunteers, worked with pregnant women, their family members and key community members through a series of home visits and community meetings. The behavior change messages were incorporated by the community into traditional folk songs, which served to further promote the practices and change social norms.

Compared to a control group that received the basic governmental and nongovernmental organization services offered in the region, villages that received the intervention saw a 54 percent reduction in infant deaths during the first month following birth. A second group, which received the same intervention plus a liquid crystal hypothermia indicator to help monitor the baby's temperature, had a 52 percent reduction in neonatal deaths.

"This study adds to a growing body of evidence that community engagement to ensure the survival of newborns and acceptance of specific changes in care practices can substantially reduce mortality in the very vulnerable first month of life," said Robert Black, MD, coauthor of the study and chair for the Bloomberg School's Department of International Health.

"The study findings validate the ongoing efforts by USAID to reduce newborn mortality through community-based strategies where health workers provide essential newborn care and promote good family care practices during the postnatal period," said Kent Hill, assistant administrator for Global Health, U.S. Agency for International Development. "Even in settings where health systems are weak, we can improve dramatically the lives of newborns."

Other authors include Saroj Mohanty, Aarti Kumar, Mathuram Santosham, Shally Awasthi, Abdullah H. Baqui, Pramod Singh, Vivek Singh, Ramesh C. Ahuja, Jai Vir Singh, Gyanendra Kumar Malik, Saifuddin Ahmed and Mahendra Bhandari.

Funding was provided by USAID and Save the Children-USA through a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Effect of community-based behavior change management on neonatal mortality in Shivgrah, Uttar Pradesh, India: a cluster-randomised controlled trial. The Lancet, September 27, 2008

Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Community-based Behavior Change Management Cuts Neonatal Mortality In Half." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080925214835.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2008, September 30). Community-based Behavior Change Management Cuts Neonatal Mortality In Half. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080925214835.htm
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. "Community-based Behavior Change Management Cuts Neonatal Mortality In Half." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080925214835.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, November 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Milestone Birthdays Can Bring Existential Crisis, Study Says

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers find that as people approach new decades in their lives they make bigger life decisions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Following the closure of schools and universities in Guinea because of the Ebola virus, students look for temporary work or gather in makeshift classrooms to catch up on their syllabus. Duration: 02:14 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins