Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Does Global Warming Lead To A Change In Upper Atmospheric Transport?

Date:
December 24, 2008
Source:
Goethe University Frankfurt
Summary:
Most atmospheric models predict that the rate of transport of air from the troposphere to the above lying stratosphere should be increasing due to climate change. Surprisingly, an international group of researchers has now found that this does not seem to be happening. On the contrary, it seems that the air air masses are moving more slowly than predicted. This could also imply that recovery of the ozone layer may be somewhat slower than predicted by state-of-the-art atmospheric climate models.

Launch of a helium-filled stratospheric balloon by the French Space Agency (CNES). Such balloons can reach altitudes of more than 35 km. The balloon shown here will have a diameter of close to 100 m and a volume of 150,000 cubic meters when reaching its ceiling altitude. During the slow descent of the balloon through the stratosphere, air samples can be collected at different altitudes.
Credit: Andreas Engel

Most atmospheric models predict that the rate of transport of air from the troposphere to the above lying stratosphere should be increasing due to climate change. Surprisingly, Dr. Andreas Engel together with an international group of researchers has now found that this does not seem to be happening. On the contrary, it seems that the air air masses are moving more slowly than predicted. This could also imply that recovery of the ozone layer may be somewhat slower than predicted by state-of-the-art atmospheric climate models.

The researchers investigated the time it takes to transport the atmospheric trace gases sulfurhexafluoride (SF6) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the troposphere (the atmospheric layer between the ground and about 10 km) to the stratosphere (the atmospheric layer between about 10 and 50 km altitude). They derived this "age" of the air from trace-gas measurements performed with large research balloons carrying measurement instrumentation up to altitudes of 35 km .

As these measurements are quite complex and expensive, they can only be performed sporadically. In cooperation with German, American and Japanese colleagues, the group gathered all measurements of these trace gases available world-wide. For this purpose, archived air samples which were collected more than 30 years ago in the stratosphere above North American, have been analysed in Frankfurt. Andreas Engel explains that "Sulfurhexafluoride is amongst the most stable gases in the atmosphere, meaning that using today's analytical techniques, it is possible to analyse even extremely small amounts present in the 30 year-old air samples."

While state-of-the-art climate models predict an increase in stratospheric transport and thus younger ages, the measurements indicate that the age seems to have increased slightly, meaning that the transport rates have not increased. The Frankfurt research group wants to continue the long-term measurement series in order to provide further measurements which can help to evaluate the model predictions and document the long-term evolution of the atmosphere.

Due to the results presented now, the predictions of atmospheric models must be re-evaluated. Andreas Engel emphasises that "our results do not contradict the principal global change predicted by the models, yet the exact mechanisms of how this influences transport of air in the upper atmosphere do not seem to be fully understood. More research is needed here."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Goethe University Frankfurt. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Engel et al. Age of stratospheric air unchanged within uncertainties over the past30 years. Nature Geoscience, 2008; DOI: 10.1038/ngeo388

Cite This Page:

Goethe University Frankfurt. "Does Global Warming Lead To A Change In Upper Atmospheric Transport?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081215111305.htm>.
Goethe University Frankfurt. (2008, December 24). Does Global Warming Lead To A Change In Upper Atmospheric Transport?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081215111305.htm
Goethe University Frankfurt. "Does Global Warming Lead To A Change In Upper Atmospheric Transport?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081215111305.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Earth & Climate News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: Balloon Descends to Bottom of Croatian Cave

Raw: Balloon Descends to Bottom of Croatian Cave

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) An Austrian balloon pilot has succeeded in taking a balloon deep underground, a feat which he believes is a world first. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bodies Recovered from Japan Volcano Eruption

Bodies Recovered from Japan Volcano Eruption

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Rescue crews finished recovering the remaining 27 bodies from atop Japan's Mount Ontake Monday. At least 31 people were killed Saturday in the mountain's first fatal volcanic event in modern history. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Japan's Mount Ontake Erupts

Raw: Japan's Mount Ontake Erupts

AP (Sep. 27, 2014) A volcano erupted in central Japan on Saturday, sending a large plume of ash high into the sky and prompting a warning to climbers and others to avoid the area. (Sept. 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California University Designs Sustainable Winery

California University Designs Sustainable Winery

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 27, 2014) Amid California's worst drought in decades, scientists at UC Davis design a sustainable winery that includes a water recycling system. Vanessa Johnston reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins