Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Link To Severe Staph Infections Found

Date:
January 1, 2009
Source:
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Summary:
Researchers recently described studies that support the link between the severity of community-acquired antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections and the Panton Valentine leukocidin.

Researchers at The University of Texas School of Public Health recently described studies that support the link between the severity of community-acquired antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA MRSA) infections and the Panton Valentine leukocidin (PVL).

Related Articles


The Panton Valentine leukocidin is made up of two components - LukF-PV and LukS-PV - and is typically produced by community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA MRSA). In the United States this strain is the most common CA MRSA isolate and can cause severe skin infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections and surgical wound infections.

This work has identified using animal models that the PVL leukotoxin can be used as a vaccine against infections caused by CA MRSA. Results from the research will be published in the December issue of Clinical Microbiology and Infection.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the antibiotic-resistant USA300 CA MRSA strain is typically acquired by persons through contact with the bacteria. This Staph strain is not typically associated with hospitalizations or medical procedures.

Eric Brown, Ph.D., assistant professor of infectious diseases at the UT School of Public Health and colleagues also tested the virulence of PVL in CA MRSA by using clinical strains of USA300 that did and did not contain the pore-forming toxin.

"The bacteria is not the same as it was several years ago. It has all of the weapons and toxins that other strains don't have, which makes it easier for this strain to survive efficiently inside of cells," Brown said.

"Immunity directed against LukS was more efficient in protecting mice against a USA300 infection compared to mice vaccinated with LukF-PV or alpha toxin," Brown said. His research found that LukS-PV was effective at protecting against certain types of infections reinforcing the importance of this virulence factor in the disease process. LukS-PV given through the nose protected the mice against pneumonia, conversely if administered subcutaneously it protected against skin infections.

Brown said, "The [vaccination] route and infection routes correlated with each other i.e., intranasally-immunized mice were better protected against pneumonia than subcutaneously vaccinated mice and subcutaneously-vaccinated mice were better protected against a skin infection than against pneumonia. This in part may be related to the type of immune response generated at the skin compared to the lung."

In addition, Brown and colleagues have examined the anti-PVL antibody responses in pediatric patients diagnosed with Staph infections compared to antibody responses to other USA300 virulence factors. The study found patients who had Staph infections caused by PVL-positive strains had a dominant response to the LukS and LukF proteins.

The research was supported by the UT School of Public Health, the Texas A&M Health Science Center, the Hamill Foundation, Baylor College of Medicine and the Universitι de Lyon, France.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brown et al. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin vaccine protects mice against lung and skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus USA300. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 2008; DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-0691.2008.02648.x

Cite This Page:

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Link To Severe Staph Infections Found." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 January 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081223172709.htm>.
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. (2009, January 1). Link To Severe Staph Infections Found. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081223172709.htm
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. "Link To Severe Staph Infections Found." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081223172709.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) — The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Anglerfish Rarely Seen In Its Habitat Will Haunt You

Anglerfish Rarely Seen In Its Habitat Will Haunt You

Newsy (Nov. 22, 2014) — For the first time Monterey Bay Aquarium recorded a video of the elusive, creepy and rarely seen anglerfish. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Birds Around the World Take Flight

Birds Around the World Take Flight

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Nov. 22, 2014) — An imperial eagle equipped with a camera spreads its wings over London. It's just one of the many birds making headlines in this week's "animal roundup". Jillian Kitchener reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) — Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins