Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Gene Therapy Reversed Heart Damage In Rats With Heart Failure

Date:
December 31, 2008
Source:
Thomas Jefferson University
Summary:
Long-term gene therapy resulted in improved cardiac function and reversed deterioration of the heart in rats with heart failure, according to a recent study.

Long-term gene therapy resulted in improved cardiac function and reversed deterioration of the heart in rats with heart failure, according to a recent study conducted by researchers at Thomas Jefferson University's Center for Translational Medicine. The study was published online in Circulation.

The rats were treated with a gene that generates a peptide called beta ARKct, which was administered to hearts in combination with recombinant-adeno-associated virus serotype 6 (rAAV6). beta ARKct works by inhibiting the activation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2).

GRK2 is a kinase that is increased in heart failure myocardium. Enhanced GRK enzymatic activity contributes to the deterioration of the heart in heart failure, according to Walter J. Koch, Ph.D., the W.W. Smith Professor of Medicine and the director of the Center for Translational Medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Koch's research team carried out the study, which was led by Giuseppe Rengo, M.D., a post-doctoral fellow.

"The theory is that by inhibiting this kinase, the heart will recover partially due to reversal of the desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptors," Dr. Koch said. "The expression of beta ARKct leads to a negative neurohormonal feedback that prevents the heart from continuing on the downward slope during heart failure. This was one novel finding of the study."

Dr. Koch and his colleagues used five groups of rats in their study. Two groups received rAAV6 with the beta ARKct peptide, two groups received rAAV6 with green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the last group received a saline treatment. One of the beta ARKct groups and one of the GFP groups also received the beta blocker metoprolol concurrently.

Twelve weeks after receiving the treatment, the rats who received the beta ARKct had a significantly increased left ventricular ejection fraction. The treatment also reversed the left ventricular deterioration and normalized the neurohormonal status. Dr. Koch said that targeting the GRK2 enzyme with beta ARKct was sufficient to reverse heart failure even without concomitant metoprolol.

The rats that received GFP or saline alone experienced more deterioration of cardiac function during the course of the study. This deterioration was prevented, but not reversed, with the concomitant metoprolol.

"Our data show that beta blockers and the beta ARKct peptide are compatible and can be given together," Dr. Koch said. "Although beta blockers are effective at stopping the downward progression of the disease, they do not reverse the damage already done. That is where the beta ARKct gene therapy comes in."

In future trials in humans, the beta ARKct peptide will be administered with beta blockers, which are the standard treatment. However, Dr. Koch said that if a pharmaceutical inhibitor can be developed, then a new class of drugs to treat heart failure could possibly even replace beta blockers.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Thomas Jefferson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Thomas Jefferson University. "Gene Therapy Reversed Heart Damage In Rats With Heart Failure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 December 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081229200746.htm>.
Thomas Jefferson University. (2008, December 31). Gene Therapy Reversed Heart Damage In Rats With Heart Failure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081229200746.htm
Thomas Jefferson University. "Gene Therapy Reversed Heart Damage In Rats With Heart Failure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081229200746.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

Deadly Fungus Killing Bats, Spreading in US

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) A disease that has killed more than six million cave-dwelling bats in the United States is on the move and wildlife biologists are worried. White Nose Syndrome, discovered in New York in 2006, has now spread to 25 states. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

Companies Ramp Up Wellness to Lower Health Costs

AP (Apr. 24, 2014) That little voice telling you to exercise, get in shape and get healthy is probably coming from your boss. More companies are beefing up wellness programs to try and cut down their health care costs. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

FDA Wants To Ban Sales Of E-Cigarettes To Minors

Newsy (Apr. 24, 2014) The Food and Drug Administration wants to crack down on the use of e-cigarettes, banning the sale of the product to minors. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Man Sees Thanks to 'bionic Eye'

Michigan Man Sees Thanks to 'bionic Eye'

AP (Apr. 23, 2014) A legally blind Michigan man is 'seeing something new every day' thanks to a high-tech retinal implant procedure. He's one of the first in the country to receive a 'bionic eye' since the federal government approved the surgery. (April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins