Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First Genome-wide Expression Analysis Yields Better Understanding Of How Leukemia Develops

Date:
February 11, 2009
Source:
University of Rochester Medical Center
Summary:
Scientists have performed a genome-wide expression analysis comparing highly enriched normal blood stem cells and leukemic stem cells, and identified several new pathways that have a key role in cancer development.

In a collaborative study published Feb. 9, 2009, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), scientists performed a genome-wide expression analysis comparing highly enriched normal blood stem cells and leukemic stem cells, and identified several new pathways that have a key role in cancer development.

Many scientists believe the best way to eradicate cancer is to find therapies that target cancer's stem cells, the cells thought to be responsible for maintaining the disease. Most cancer treatments today fail to attack cancer at its root, which is why the disease can recur despite aggressive therapy.

Before the development of cancer stem cell therapies can take place, however, scientists must improve our understanding of the similarities and differences between biological networks active in leukemic stem cells and their normal cell counterparts

The PNAS paper showed that by using modern microarray technology, scientists could reveal a swath of stem-cell pathways – some of which were already well known and others not previously implicated in leukemia and other cancers. In fact, researchers identified 3,005 differentially expressed genes. Among them, a ribosome and T-cell receptor signaling pathway emerged as new players in the regulation of cancer stem cells.

The direct comparison of leukemic stems cells (obtained by consent from patients) to normal blood stem cells, also provides critical insight into the differences found in malignancy that may be used to develop targeted therapy, said Michael W. Becker, M.D., an assistant professor at the James P. Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Becker was a co-first author.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Rochester Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Rochester Medical Center. "First Genome-wide Expression Analysis Yields Better Understanding Of How Leukemia Develops." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090209205200.htm>.
University of Rochester Medical Center. (2009, February 11). First Genome-wide Expression Analysis Yields Better Understanding Of How Leukemia Develops. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090209205200.htm
University of Rochester Medical Center. "First Genome-wide Expression Analysis Yields Better Understanding Of How Leukemia Develops." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090209205200.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins