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Soil Carbon Storage Is Not Always Influenced By Tillage Practices

Date:
February 25, 2009
Source:
Soil Science Society of America
Summary:
Recent research studied the impacts of tillage and nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on carbon storage, revealing that the effect of no-till on carbon sequestration can be variable depending on soil and climatic conditions and nutrient management practices.

The practice of no-till has increased considerably during the past 20 yr. Soils under no-till usually host a more abundant and diverse biota and are less prone to erosion, water loss, and structural breakdown than tilled soils.

Their organic matter content is also often increased and consequently, no-till is proposed as a measure to mitigate the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. However, recent studies show that the effect of no-till on carbon sequestration can be variable depending on soil and climatic conditions, and nutrient management practices.

Researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (Quιbec City) investigated the impacts of tillage (no-till vs. moldboard plowing) and N and P fertilization on carbon storage in a clay loam soil under cool and humid conditions in eastern Canada. Corn and soybean had been grown in a yearly rotation for 14 yr.

The authors concluded that their investigation indicates “…no-till enhanced soil organic carbon (SOC) content in the soil surface layer, but moldboard plowing resulted in greater SOC content near the bottom of the plow layer. When the entire soil profile (0-60 cm) was considered, both effects compensated each other which resulted in statistically equivalent SOC stocks for both tillage practices”.

The effects of tillage and N fertilization varied depending on the soil depth considered. When considering only the top 20 cm of soil, the lowest C stocks were measured in the plowed soil with the highest N fertilizer level, whereas the highest SOC stocks were observed in the NT treatment with the highest N rate. The authors hypothesized that while N fertilization favored a greater residue accumulation in the top 20 cm of no-till soils, mixing of crop residue with soil particles and N fertilizer by tillage stimulated the mineralization of residue and native soil carbon.

However, when accounting for the whole soil profile, these variations in the surface 20 cm of soil were counterbalanced by significant SOC accumulation in the 20- to 30-cm soil layer of tilled soils, resulting in statistically equivalent SOC stocks for all tillage and N treatments. This study further emphasizes the importance of taking into account the whole soil profile when determining management effects on SOC storage, especially when full-inversion tillage is involved. The authors conclude that “only considering the top 20 cm of soil would have led us to an erroneous evaluation of the interactive effects of tillage and N fertilization on SOC stock”.

Field studies of the impact of tillage and fertilization on carbon storage have yielded contrasting results in various parts of the world.  An explanation of the high intersite variability of the influence of no-till on soil carbon storage will require that we understand the impacts of no-till and fertilizer management on SOC sequestration for various soil and climatic conditions. Further, researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada are pursuing their investigations to understand the factors that control the accumulation of soil carbon at depth under moldboard plowing.  Specifically, they now focus their efforts on the role of clay particles and soil aggregation in stabilizing carbon.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Soil Science Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Poirier et al. Interactive Effects of Tillage and Mineral Fertilization on Soil Carbon Profiles. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 2009; 73 (1): 255 DOI: 10.2136/sssaj2008.0006

Cite This Page:

Soil Science Society of America. "Soil Carbon Storage Is Not Always Influenced By Tillage Practices." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225132349.htm>.
Soil Science Society of America. (2009, February 25). Soil Carbon Storage Is Not Always Influenced By Tillage Practices. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225132349.htm
Soil Science Society of America. "Soil Carbon Storage Is Not Always Influenced By Tillage Practices." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090225132349.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

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