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Huntington Disease Begins To Take Hold Early On

Date:
April 21, 2009
Source:
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Summary:
A global analysis of brain proteins over a 10-week period in a mouse model of Huntington disease has revealed some new insights into this complex neurodegenerative disorder.

A global analysis of brain proteins over a 10-week period in a mouse model of Huntington Disease has revealed some new insights into this complex neurodegenerative disorder. For example, profound changes (comparable to those seen in late-stage HD) actually occur well before any disease symptoms show up, and most of the changes are confined to a specific stage during disease progression.

These findings should aid in determining the optimal times for therapies that aim to treat or cure this disease.

While HD (which is brought on by mutations in the gene for Huntingtin has been studied extensively at the cellular level, much of the work has been focused on late-stage disease when the various symptoms (declines in both motor coordination and cognitive ability) have already manifested. But since HD is an inherited condition, changes likely occur much earlier, and to get a better sense of disease progression, Claus Zabel and colleagues used proteomics to analyze the brains of HD mice at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks of age, a period that covers absence of any disease-related phenotypes to the pronounced disease state.

Unexpectedly, they found a large number of protein alterations (almost 6% of the total) as early as 2 weeks of age; a significant portion of these changes contributed to an increase in glucose metabolism, which corresponds to the weight loss that occurs early during HD progression. As the disease progressed over 10 weeks, though, the affected proteins kept changing. In fact, about 70% of observed changes were confined to one of the five time points examined and no proteins were similarly altered in all 5 stages.

Therefore this study argues against an HD model in which there is a gradual increase in the number and magnitude of protein changes and instead leans toward a more dynamic pathology. Zabel and colleagues suggest that these early changes affect late stage disease by irreversibly changing the biochemical activity in the mouse brain.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Zabel et al. A Large Number of Protein Expression Changes Occur Early in Life and Precede Phenotype Onset in a Mouse Model for Huntington Disease. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 2008; 8 (4): 720 DOI: 10.1074/mcp.M800277-MCP200

Cite This Page:

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. "Huntington Disease Begins To Take Hold Early On." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090416161135.htm>.
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. (2009, April 21). Huntington Disease Begins To Take Hold Early On. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090416161135.htm
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. "Huntington Disease Begins To Take Hold Early On." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090416161135.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

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