Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Learning Disabilities In Males: Nine New X Chromosome Genes Linked To Learning Disabilities

Date:
April 20, 2009
Source:
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
Summary:
Researchers looked at nearly 800 hundred genes on the X chromosome to reveal nine new genes that contribute to learning disabilities, which -- because of their location on the X chromosome -- are known to affect mainly males. The results will boost the provision of diagnostics and counseling for families affected by learning disabilities.

Family with missense variants in the CASK gene, one of the genes discovered in this study. Individuals with the missense variant are denoted by a *. Females are denoted with circles and males with squares. Black shading denotes individuals with learning disabilities.
Credit: Image courtesy of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

A collaboration between more than 70 researchers across the globe has uncovered nine new genes on the X chromosome that, when knocked-out, lead to learning disabilities. The international team studied almost all X chromosome genes in 208 families with learning disabilities - the largest screen of this type ever reported.

Remarkably, the team also found that approximately 1-2% of X chromosome genes, when knocked-out, have no apparent effect on an individual's ability to function in the ordinary world. The publication in Nature Genetics - a culmination of five years of scientific collaboration - emphasises the power of sequencing approaches to identify novel genes of clinical importance, but also highlights the challenges researchers face when carrying out this kind of study.

Estimates suggest that the prevalence of learning disability is 2-3%. Learning disability is significantly more common in males than in females and genetic causes have long been sought on the X chromosome: males have only one X chromosome and so a gene mutation on the X is more likely to have an effect in males than in females.

"We sequenced 720 out of the approximately 800 known genes on the X chromosome in more than 200 families affected by X-linked learning disabilities," explains Professor Mike Stratton, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "This is the largest sequencing study of complex disease ever reported."

In part because of their apparent effects in males, X-linked disorders have been well studied by geneticists over the past 25 years. Conceived by Dr Lucy Raymond, from the University of Cambridge, and Professor Mike Stratton, the collaborative study harnessed DNA sequencing to detect as many new abnormal genes as possible. In the future similar strategy will be used to find disease causing sequence variants implicated in other complex genetic diseases.

Some characteristics in common could be identified in patients with variants in the same gene. However, in many, learning disability was the only feature. The newly identified genes play roles in a wide range of biological processes suggesting that disruption to many cellular machines can damage the nervous system.

"As well as these important new gene discoveries relating to learning disability, we have also uncovered a small proportion - 1% or more - of X chromosome protein-coding genes that, when knocked out, appear to have no effect on the characteristics of the individual," explains Mike Stratton. "It is remarkable that so many protein-coding genes can be lost without any apparent effect on an individual's normal existence - this is a surprising result and further research will be necessary in this area."

This finding will also act as a warning to geneticists. Large-scale studies are designed to uncover associations between knocked-out genes and disease. However, this study shows that a small proportion of gene knock-outs have no discernible effect on the individual. In future studies, researchers must therefore be cautious about assuming that the presence of a knocked out gene in an individual with a particular disease means that the knocked out gene is causing the disease.

The research comes towards the end of a long process of gene cataloguing in this field. Scientists believe that there are likely to be more undiscovered genes that contribute to X-linked learning disabilities; however, variants at what are expected to be lower frequency will become increasingly difficult and costly to uncover. The next challenge is to implement this improved knowledge of the complex of genes that lead to learning disabilities in clinical practice.

"We already offer genetic counselling to families with X-linked learning disabilities," says Dr Lucy Raymond, Reader in Neurogenetics, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research at the University of Cambridge. "This new research uncovers yet more genes that can be incorporated to improve the provision of diagnostics to families with learning disabilities and allow us to develop more comprehensive genetic counselling in the future, allowing parents and the extended family to make the most informed family planning decisions."

Although in most cases improved treatments remain to be developed, information about a genetic condition can provide support to affected families. The information can also help to inform reproductive choices.

This research was supported by the New South Wales Department of Health, the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, the SMILE foundation, the WCH Foundation, Adelaide, Mr D Harwood, the European Union, the US National Institutes of Health, the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN), Action Medical Research and the Wellcome Trust.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tarpey PS et a. A systematic, large-scale resequencing screen of the X chromosome coding exons in mental retardation. Nature Genetics, DOI: 10.1038/ng.367

Cite This Page:

Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "Learning Disabilities In Males: Nine New X Chromosome Genes Linked To Learning Disabilities." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090419133841.htm>.
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. (2009, April 20). Learning Disabilities In Males: Nine New X Chromosome Genes Linked To Learning Disabilities. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090419133841.htm
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "Learning Disabilities In Males: Nine New X Chromosome Genes Linked To Learning Disabilities." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090419133841.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins