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New Light Shed On 'Dark' Gamma-ray Bursts

Date:
June 21, 2009
Source:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
Summary:
Gamma-ray bursts are the universe's biggest explosions, capable of producing so much light that ground-based telescopes easily detect it billions of light-years away. Yet, for more than a decade, astronomers have puzzled over the nature of so-called dark bursts, which produce gamma rays and X-rays but little or no visible light. They make up roughly half of the bursts detected by NASA's Swift satellite since its 2004 launch.

Dense knots of dust in otherwise normal galaxies dim the light of a dark gamma-ray burst (center). The dust absorbs most or all of a burst's visible light but not higher-energy X-rays and gamma rays.
Credit: NASA/Swift/Aurore Simonnet

Gamma-ray bursts are the universe's biggest explosions, capable of producing so much light that ground-based telescopes easily detect it billions of light-years away. Yet, for more than a decade, astronomers have puzzled over the nature of so-called dark bursts, which produce gamma rays and X-rays but little or no visible light. They make up roughly half of the bursts detected by NASA's Swift satellite since its 2004 launch.

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At the American Astronomical Society meeting in Pasadena, Calif., an international team of astronomers have reported surprising new insight into dark bursts. The study finds that most occur in normal galaxies detectable by large, ground-based optical telescopes.

"One possible explanation for dark bursts was that they were occurring so far away their visible light was completely extinguished," said Joshua Bloom, associate professor of astronomy at the University of California (UC), Berkeley and the study's senior author. Thanks to the expansion of the universe and a thickening fog of hydrogen gas at increasing cosmic distances, astronomers see no visible light from objects more than about 12.9 billion light-years away. Another possibility: Dark bursts were exploding in galaxies with unusually thick amounts of interstellar dust, which absorbed a burst's light but not its higher-energy radiation.

Using one of the world's largest optical telescopes, the 10-meter Keck I in Hawaii, the team looked for unknown galaxies at the locations of 14 Swift-discovered dark bursts. "For eleven of these bursts, we found a faint, normal galaxy," said Daniel Perley, the UC Berkeley graduate student who led the study. If these galaxies were located at extreme distances, not even the Keck telescope could see them. Most gamma-ray bursts occur when massive stars run out of nuclear fuel. As their cores collapse into a black hole or neutron star, gas jets -- driven by processes not fully understood -- punch through the star and blast into space. There, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, which generates short-lived afterglows in many wavelengths, including visible light.

For 11 of these 14 dark bursts, the team successfully detected a distant galaxy hosting the explosion, while the remaining three bursts without detectable hosts had faint optical counterparts. This indicates that none of these bursts had come from the most distant regions of the universe, since at distances greater than about 12.9 billion light years all the detectable light from both the afterglow and the host galaxy would be shifted into the infrared due to the expansion of the universe.

''And while 12.9 billion light years is a large distance even by most astronomers' standards, gamma-ray bursts are so powerful that if these were frequent occurrences 13 billion years ago, we ought to be detecting large numbers of those same explosions today as high redshift events," Cenko said. "We don't, which indicates that the first stars formed at a less frenzied pace than some models suggested."

The lack of any very high redshift events in the sample indicates that these distant explosions cannot comprise more than a few percent of all gamma-ray bursts, Cenko said. However, such distant bursts are known to exist. Just two months ago, a gamma-ray burst at a distance of 13.1 billion years was discovered.

"Putting this recent event together with the others in our study, for the first time we can provide both an upper and lower limit to the fraction of gamma-ray bursts at very high redshift," Perley said. Specifically, the authors conclude that the high redshift fraction is between 0.2 and 7 percent.

Because none of the 14 bursts studied in the survey is at this distance, by far the most likely cause of the bursts' optical dimness is dust inside the host galaxy absorbing light from the afterglow before it escapes, the team concluded. However, the starlight shows no obvious signatures of dust, indicating that the dust may be hiding in patches or clouds where it is difficult to detect.

Consequently, there could be much more dust than has been suspected as the result of measurements using other techniques, and "dark gamma-ray bursts could provide a complementary way of answering the question of how much star formation was going on inside galaxies in the early universe," Perley said.

A paper on the findings has been submitted to The Astronomical Journal.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "New Light Shed On 'Dark' Gamma-ray Bursts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 June 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608131150.htm>.
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. (2009, June 21). New Light Shed On 'Dark' Gamma-ray Bursts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608131150.htm
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. "New Light Shed On 'Dark' Gamma-ray Bursts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090608131150.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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