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An Inner 'Fingerprint' For Personalizing Medical Care

Date:
August 24, 2009
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Fingerprints, move over. Scientists are reporting evidence that people have another defining trait that may distinguish each of the 6.7 billion humans on Earth from one another almost as surely as the arches, loops, and whorls on their fingertips. Scientists now report evidence from studies in humans for the existence of unique patterns in metabolism.
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Scientists are reporting evidence that people have unique patterns of metabolism, or a "metabolic fingerprint," that may distinguish each of the 6.7 billion humans on Earth from one another almost as surely as the arches, loops, and whorls on their fingertips.
Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Fingerprints move over. Scientists are reporting evidence that people have another defining trait that may distinguish each of the 6.7 billion humans on Earth from one another almost as surely as the arches, loops, and whorls on their fingertips. They report evidence from studies in humans for the existence of unique patterns in metabolism.

Metabolism is a whole caboodle of chemical processes. The body uses to turn food into energy, grow, repair damage from diseases and injuries, use medicines, and carry out other functions necessary to continue living. In the new study, Ivano Bertini and colleagues cite growing evidence that each individual has a unique metabolic profile. It's a biochemical counterpart to fingerprints that can be detected by analyzing the chemical whorls and grooves that result from metabolism and can be detected in the urine.

Doctors have dreamed of using such tests for the early diagnosis of disease and personalized medical care. They could pick drugs and treatments that are best for each individual, rather than today's one-size-fits all medicine. To do so, however, doctors need evidence that the metabolic fingerprint remains stable over a period of years, with changes due to disease or medications, for instance, but not advancing age or other factors. The new study provides that evidence, based on the analysis of over 1,800 urine samples from people monitored for 2-3 years. Researchers could identify individual patients from their metabolic profiles with an accuracy of over 99 percent. The study could pave the way for using metabolic profiling to apply personalized medical care, the researchers suggest.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Bernini et al. Individual Human Phenotypes in Metabolic Space and Time. Journal of Proteome Research, 2009; 090625075642001 DOI: 10.1021/pr900344m

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "An Inner 'Fingerprint' For Personalizing Medical Care." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090722110859.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2009, August 24). An Inner 'Fingerprint' For Personalizing Medical Care. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 23, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090722110859.htm
American Chemical Society. "An Inner 'Fingerprint' For Personalizing Medical Care." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090722110859.htm (accessed May 23, 2015).

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