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Scientists Report Original Source Of Malaria

Date:
August 4, 2009
Source:
University of California - Irvine
Summary:
Researchers have identified what they believe is the original source of malignant malaria: a parasite found in chimpanzees in equatorial Africa. The deadly parasite jumped to humans from chimpanzees, perhaps through one mosquito.

UCI's Francisco Ayala and colleagues report in a new study that malignant malaria originates from a parasite found in chimpanzees in equatorial Africa.
Credit: Daniel A. Anderson / University Communications

Researchers have identified what they believe is the original source of malignant malaria: a parasite found in chimpanzees in equatorial Africa.

UC Irvine biologist Francisco Ayala and colleagues think the deadly parasite was transmitted to humans from chimpanzees perhaps as recently as 5,000 years ago – and possibly through a single mosquito, genetic analyses indicate. Previously, malaria's origin had been unclear.

This discovery could aid the development of a vaccine for malaria, which sickens about 500 million people and kills about 1.5 million each year. It also furthers understanding of how infectious diseases such as HIV, SARS, and avian and swine flu can be transmitted to humans from animals.

"When malaria transferred to humans, it became very severe very quickly," said Ayala, co-author of the study that reports these findings. "The disease in humans has become resistant to many drugs. It's my hope that our discovery will bring us closer to making a vaccine."

The study appears online the week of Aug. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Human malignant malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium falciparum, which is responsible for 85 percent of all infections and nearly all malaria deaths. Chimpanzees were known to carry a closely related parasite called Plasmodium reichenowi, but most scientists assumed the two had existed separately in humans and chimpanzees for the last 5 million years.

Scientists in the current study examined several new strains of the parasite found in blood taken from wild and wild-born chimpanzees in Cameroon and Ivory Coast sanctuaries during routine health exams.

A gene analysis linked one chimpanzee strain to all worldwide strains of the human malaria parasite. This connection suggests that one mosquito may have transferred malaria to humans. Because there is little genetic variance among strains of the human parasite, scientists believe the transmission occurred in the recent past – maybe 5,000 to 2 million years ago – though an exact time could not be determined.

The results support an earlier hypothesis by Dr. Ajit Varki of UC San Diego and colleagues that genetic mutations made humans first resistant to sickness from the chimpanzee parasite, then extremely susceptible to illness from the human form.

They also corroborate an earlier finding by Ayala and former UCI graduate student Stephen Rich that malignant malaria started spreading throughout the tropics and world about 5,000 years ago, when agriculture began in Africa. Rich, now a professor at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, also is the lead author of the current PNAS study.

In addition to Ayala and Rich, Nathan Wolfe of Stanford University worked on the study, along with collaborators from the Robert Koch Institute and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany; the Global Viral Forecasting Initiative in San Francisco; the Biotechnology Centre in Cameroon; the U.S. Department of Agriculture; and the Ebola Tai Forest Project in the Ivory Coast.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, with additional support from the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University and the National Geographic Society Committee for Research & Exploration.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Irvine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California - Irvine. "Scientists Report Original Source Of Malaria." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803173252.htm>.
University of California - Irvine. (2009, August 4). Scientists Report Original Source Of Malaria. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803173252.htm
University of California - Irvine. "Scientists Report Original Source Of Malaria." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803173252.htm (accessed April 24, 2014).

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