Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Tool May Help With Early Detection Of Deadly Pancreatic Cancer

Date:
August 4, 2009
Source:
Van Andel Research Institute
Summary:
A new diagnostic tool has shown promising results when used with patients of pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest forms of cancer due to the difficulty of diagnosing it in its early stages. The method, which studies carbohydrate structures in the bloodstream, could lead to the development of blood tests that can detect cancer more effectively.

A new diagnostic tool developed by Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists has shown promising results when used with patients of pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest forms of cancer due to the difficulty of diagnosing it in its early stages. The method, which studies carbohydrate structures in the bloodstream, could lead to the development of blood tests that can detect cancer more effectively.

Related Articles


“Tumor cells sometimes shed proteins into a patient’s bloodstream,” said VARI Senior Scientific Investigator Brian Haab, Ph.D., whose lab published its findings in the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. “These proteins can have carbohydrate structures attached to them that might be able to tell us not only if a patient has cancer, but also more about the cancer and how to treat it.”

Associating specific carbohydrate alterations on proteins with cancer could provide better cancer detection than the measuring of protein levels alone, the current, most-commonly-used method of blood testing for many types of cancer. Haab said that specific alterations also could be connected to specific cancer characteristics, such as the ability to spread or resistance to therapy. Some carbohydrate alterations also could have distinct functions in cancer progression, which might have therapeutic value.

Researchers used the method to study blood samples from pancreatic cancer patients at Evanston Northwestern Healthcare in Illinois. They identified the prevalence of a variety of alterations on different proteins.

“Interestingly, the protein with the most alterations was not previously recognized as a marker for pancreatic cancer, perhaps because the protein level alone did not provide good cancer detection,” said Tingting Yue, a Michigan State University graduate student working at VARI and lead author of the study. “This protein is found in pre-malignant lesions and could be valuable for early detection if we can find unique alterations associated with it.”

“We greatly need improved diagnostic tests to find tumors at the earliest possible stages to provide the most appropriate and effective treatment for pancreatic cancer patients and to improve their chances of recovery,” said Randall E. Brand, M.D., Professor of Medicine at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, another of the study’s authors. “These results are an encouraging step toward that goal.”


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Van Andel Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Van Andel Research Institute. "New Tool May Help With Early Detection Of Deadly Pancreatic Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803173256.htm>.
Van Andel Research Institute. (2009, August 4). New Tool May Help With Early Detection Of Deadly Pancreatic Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 30, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803173256.htm
Van Andel Research Institute. "New Tool May Help With Early Detection Of Deadly Pancreatic Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090803173256.htm (accessed March 30, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, March 30, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins