Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Sequencing Technique Could Boost Pine Beetle Fight, Improve Cancer Research

Date:
September 29, 2009
Source:
University of British Columbia
Summary:
Researchers have helped developed a cheaper, faster way to compile draft genome sequences that could advance the fight against mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation and improve cancer research.

Pine trees near Kamloops, B.C., turn red after being killed by mountain pine beetle, a naturally occurring insect that has ravaged the Interior of B.C.'s pine forests in recent years.
Credit: iStockphoto/Robert Koopmans

UBC researchers have helped developed a cheaper, faster way to compile draft genome sequences that could advance the fight against mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation and improve cancer research.

Related Articles


Current sequencing methods have a variety of advantages and disadvantages--including the cost involved. Dr Steven Jones and colleagues at UBC, the BC Cancer Agency and Simon Fraser University have combined cutting edge hardware with novel software to compile genome sequences at a fraction of the cost of previous methods.

The technique is outlined in the current issue of the journal Genome Biology.

Using the new approach, the research team--which also includes UBC's Joerg Bohlmann, Colette Breuil and Richard Hamelin--has compiled the first complete genome sequence of a fungus (Grosmannia clavigera) that is key to the mountain pine beetle infestation process.

“The key to better preparedness for future forest health crises such as the current mountain pine beetle epidemic lies in better understanding of the three main players–the trees, the bark beetles and a fungus–and their complex interactions,” said Bohlmann, Distinguished University Scholar and professor at UBC’s Michael Smith Laboratories.

“The infestation has affected 10 to 14 million hectares of pine forests in British Columbia. We can’t fight an enemy if we don’t know what it’s made of. The complete genome of the fungus brings us one step closer to winning the battle."

By triggering and overwhelming the trees’ defence mechanism, the fungus weakens the trees and creates an ideal environment for beetles to nest. It also stains the wood blue in the process, making the MPB-affected wood less marketable.

“This study has much wider research implications. What we learned from assembling the draft sequence of a fungus, we can now apply to sequencing human genomes,” says Jones, Head of Bioinfomatics at the BC Cancer Agency’s Genome Sciences Centre. “We're now using this novel approach to decode cancer tumours.”

“The ability to combine molecular biology techniques and computational approaches in this way really helps establish British Columbia as one of the leading jurisdictions in genome science.”

The research was partially funded by Genome BC, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the British Columbia Ministry of Forests, the Natural Resources Canada Genomics program, and the BC Cancer Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of British Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of British Columbia. "New Sequencing Technique Could Boost Pine Beetle Fight, Improve Cancer Research." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915154851.htm>.
University of British Columbia. (2009, September 29). New Sequencing Technique Could Boost Pine Beetle Fight, Improve Cancer Research. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915154851.htm
University of British Columbia. "New Sequencing Technique Could Boost Pine Beetle Fight, Improve Cancer Research." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090915154851.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Stray Dog Follows Adventure Racing Team for 6-Day Endurance Race

Stray Dog Follows Adventure Racing Team for 6-Day Endurance Race

Buzz60 (Nov. 24, 2014) A Swedish Adventure racing team travels to try and win a world title, but comes home with something way better: a stray dog that joined the team for much of the grueling 430-mile race. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Deadly Japanese Pufferfish Discovered in Crimean Waters

Deadly Japanese Pufferfish Discovered in Crimean Waters

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) The capture of deadly Japanese pufferfish in the waters of Crimea is causing concern for fishermen and scientists alike. Sharon Reich reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Terrifying Black Seadevil Fish Captured on First-of-Its Kind Video

Terrifying Black Seadevil Fish Captured on First-of-Its Kind Video

Buzz60 (Nov. 24, 2014) An aquarium captures a first-of-its kind video of a notoriously camera-shy fish that’s also not so camera-friendly. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Red Panda Cubs Explore the Bratislava Zoo

Red Panda Cubs Explore the Bratislava Zoo

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) Four-month old Red Panda twins Pim and Pam still rely on their mother for breast milk at the Bratislava Zoo in Slovakia, but the precocious cubs have begun to branch out to solid foods, as well. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins