Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Lime Mortars In Conservation: Traditional Materials And Craft For The Future

Date:
September 30, 2009
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
Plaster made from lime is environment-friendly, repairable and sustainable. Despite this, lime plaster on historic buildings has been replaced in modern times by plaster containing Portland cement -- which has caused severe damage. Experts, researchers, craftsmen, manufacturers and authorities from throughout the Nordic region are now assembling for a conference on lime and lime mortar, with the aim of promoting historic buildings, as well as new build access to traditional building materials.

Läckö Castle.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Gothenburg

Plaster made from lime is environment-friendly, repairable and sustainable. Despite this, lime plaster on historic buildings has been replaced in modern times by plaster containing Portland cement – which has caused severe damage to historic buildings. Experts, researchers, craftsmen, manufacturers and authorities from throughout the Nordic region are now assembling for the 10:th Jubilee Conference on lime and lime mortar, with the aim of promoting historic buildings, as well as new build, access to traditional building materials.

Related Articles


When the Nordic Building Limes Forum was formed in 1999 it was as a reaction against the harsh treatment of historic buildings all over the Nordic region, where original lime plasters were replaced with hard, cementitious mortars. Today Kalmar Castle, the ruins of Borgholm Castle and Läckö Castle bear the marks of this harsh treatment. The castles, which are a part of Sweden’s national cultural heritage, are now being repaired using traditional, locally produced lime mortar.

Läckö is a unique project

Läckö Castle, dating from the Middle Ages and rebuilt and extended in the 17th century, was replastered with cementitious mortar in the 1960s. The plaster on the castle’s 10,000 square metre façade today shows serious signs of decay due to damp, frost and salts. The National Property Board, which owns and manages the castle, consequently instituted an extensive new restoration of the castle’s exterior. This provided the opportunity for a Nordic research team consisting of conservationists/architects, chemists, geologists and building-archaeologists to develop and "re-create" the traditional lime plaster through a unique research project. The research is co-ordinated by the University of Gothenburg.

Nordic conference

One of the goals of the Läckö project has been to develop methods for the conservation and repair of architectural heritage – but also to pave the way for lime plaster and traditional craftsmanship to be used on historic buildings.

The Nordic Building Limes Forum, a network that brings together craftsmen, researchers, producers, officials, architects, administrators and contractors from throughout the Nordic region, is holding a conference at Kalmar Castle on 1-2 October. Representatives from related European lime networks – from the UK, Ireland and Italy – participate in the conference. The conference will present current research and restoration projects such as the ongoing works at Kalmar, Borgholm and Läckö Castles, where local materials, produced on a small scale, are applied.

“If we are to keep the traditional crafts alive we must also adapt them to modern building techniques. Lime and lime mortar, which are sustainable and eco-friendly materials, can be readily used even in new build,” says Ewa Sandström Malinowski, researcher at the Department of Conservation, University of Gothenburg, and responsible for planning the conference.

The conference is organized as a collaboration between the Nordic Building Limes Forum, the National Property Board, the University of Gothenburg and the Nordic Culture Fund.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "Lime Mortars In Conservation: Traditional Materials And Craft For The Future." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090928131214.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2009, September 30). Lime Mortars In Conservation: Traditional Materials And Craft For The Future. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090928131214.htm
University of Gothenburg. "Lime Mortars In Conservation: Traditional Materials And Craft For The Future." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090928131214.htm (accessed November 27, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

NASA's First 3-D Printer In Space Creates Its First Object

NASA's First 3-D Printer In Space Creates Its First Object

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — The International Space Station is now using a proof-of-concept 3D printer to test additive printing in a weightless, isolated environment. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Bolivian Recycling Initiative Turns Plastic Waste Into School Furniture

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Innovative recycling project in La Paz separates city waste and converts plastic garbage into school furniture made from 'plastiwood'. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Blu-Ray Discs Getting Second Run As Solar Panels

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers at Northwestern University are repurposing Blu-ray movies for better solar panel technology thanks to the discs' internal structures. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins