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Tsunami Waves Reasonably Likely To Strike Israel, Geo-archaeological Research Suggests

Date:
October 26, 2009
Source:
University of Haifa
Summary:
There is a likely chance of tsunami waves reaching the shores of Israel, says one researcher, following geoarchaeological research at the port of Caesarea. Tsunami events in the Mediterranean occur less frequently than in the Pacific Ocean, but recent findings reveal a moderate rate of recurrence.

Ancient port city of Caesarea, Israel.
Credit: iStockphoto/Vladimir Khirman

"There is a likely chance of tsunami waves reaching the shores of Israel," says Dr. Beverly Goodman of the Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences at the University of Haifa following an encompassing geo-archaeological study at the port of Caesarea. "Tsunami events in the Mediterranean do occur less frequently than in the Pacific Ocean, but our findings reveal a moderate rate of recurrence," she says.

Dr. Goodman, an expert geo-archaeologist, exposed geological evidence of this by chance. Her original intentions in Caesarea were to assist in research at the ancient port and at offshore shipwrecks.

"We expected to find the remains of ships, but were surprised to reveal unusual geological layers the likes of which we had never seen in the region before. We began underwater drilling assuming that these are simply local layers related to the construction of the port. However, we discovered that they are spread along the entire area and realized that we had found something major," she explains.

Geological drilling -- in areas of 1-3 meters in length and at various depths -- enabled Dr. Goodman to date the underwater layers using two methods: carbon-14 dating and OSL (optically stimulated luminescence). She found evidence of four tsunami events at Caesarea: in 1500 BC, 100-200 CE, 500-600 CE, and 1100-1200 CE.

In an article published by the Geological Society of America, Dr. Goodman explains that the earliest of these tsunamis resulted from the eruption of the Santorini volcano, which affected the entire Mediterranean region. The later, more local tsunami waves, Dr. Goodman assumes, were generated by underwater landslides caused by earthquakes. "'Local' does not necessarily imply 'small'. These could have been waves reaching 5 meters high and as far as 2 km onshore. Coastal communities within this range would have undoubtedly been severely damaged from such a tsunami. While communities onshore clear the ground after such an event and return to civilization, tsunami evidence is preserved under the water," she explains.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Haifa. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Beverly N. Goodman-Tchernov, Hendrik W. Dey, Eduard G. Reinhardt, Floyd McCoy, and Yossi Mart. Tsunami waves generated by the Santorini eruption reached Eastern Mediterranean shores. Geology, 2009; 37 (10): 943 DOI: 10.1130/G25704A.1

Cite This Page:

University of Haifa. "Tsunami Waves Reasonably Likely To Strike Israel, Geo-archaeological Research Suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091026093728.htm>.
University of Haifa. (2009, October 26). Tsunami Waves Reasonably Likely To Strike Israel, Geo-archaeological Research Suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091026093728.htm
University of Haifa. "Tsunami Waves Reasonably Likely To Strike Israel, Geo-archaeological Research Suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091026093728.htm (accessed August 23, 2014).

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