Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Why diseased heart muscle cells don't communicate properly

Date:
December 31, 2009
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
The heartbeat is controlled by rapid conduction of an electrical current between heart muscle cells. Central to passage of the electrical current are structures known as gap junctions, low resistance conduits that link heart muscle cells and consist of proteins known as connexins.

The heartbeat is controlled by rapid conduction of an electrical current between heart muscle cells. Central to passage of the electrical current are structures known as gap junctions, low resistance conduits that link heart muscle cells and consist of proteins known as connexins.

Many forms of heart disease are associated with decreased gap junction coupling, and these changes predispose to abnormal heartbeats, which can be lethal. Robin Shaw and colleagues, at the University of California at San Francisco, have now identified a reason why there is decreased gap junction coupling in these situations using human, mouse, and zebrafish heart tissue.

The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

In the study, the protein EB1, which delivers connexins to gap junctions, was found to be displaced in ischemic human hearts, stressed mouse hearts, and isolated cells subjected to oxidative stress, leading to decreased gap junction coupling. Further, in zebrafish hearts, oxidative stress reduced the membrane localization of connexin and slowed the spread of electrical currents.

The authors hope that developing approaches to preserve the ability of cells to transport connexins to the cell surface to form gap junctions might reduce potentially lethal abnormal heartbeats in humans with diseased hearts.

In an accompanying commentary, Gordon Tomaselli, at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, discusses the importance of maintaining normal gap junction function in the heart and explains how the work of Shaw and colleagues fits into the complex puzzle that is our understanding of how heart muscle cells communicate.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. James W. Smyth, Ting-Ting Hong, Danchen Gao, Jacob M. Vogan, Brian C. Jensen, Tina S. Fong, Paul C. Simpson, Didier Y.r. Stainier, Neil C. Chi, and Robin M. Shaw. Limited forward trafficking of connexin 43 reduces cell-cell coupling in stressed human and mouse myocardium. Journal of Clinical Investigation, Published December 28, 2009 DOI: 10.1172/JCI39740
  2. Gordon F. Tomaselli. Oxidant stress derails the cardiac connexon connection. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010; 120 (1): 87-89 DOI: 10.1172/JCI41780

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Why diseased heart muscle cells don't communicate properly." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091228171858.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2009, December 31). Why diseased heart muscle cells don't communicate properly. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091228171858.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "Why diseased heart muscle cells don't communicate properly." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091228171858.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Some Positive Ebola News: Outbreak 'Contained' In Nigeria

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC says a new case of Ebola has not been reported in Nigeria for more than 21 days, leading to hopes the outbreak might be nearing its end. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

UN Ebola Mission Head: Immediate Action Is Crucial

AFP (Sep. 30, 2014) The newly appointed head of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), Anthony Banbury, outlines operations to tackle the virus. Duration: 00:39 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

CDC Confirms First Case of Ebola in US

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) The CDC has confirmed the first diagnosed case of Ebola in the United States. The patient is being treated at a Dallas hospital after traveling earlier this month from Liberia. (Sept. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

New Breast Cancer Drug Extends Lives In Clinical Trial

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) In a clinical trial, breast cancer patients lived an average of 15 months longer when they received new drug Perjeta along with Herceptin. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins