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Targeting cancerous vessels

Date:
January 10, 2010
Source:
Rockefeller University Press
Summary:
By lowering the level of a neuronal protein, researchers halted the growth of blood vessels that tumors rely on for survival.
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Vascular endothelial cells (green) express {delta}-catenin (red).
Credit: DeBusk, L.M., et al. 2010. J. Exp. Med. doi:10.1084/jem.20091097

By lowering the level of a neuronal protein, researchers halted the growth of blood vessels that tumors rely on for survival.

The findings are reported online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine on Jan. 4, 2010.

Formerly known for its effects on neuronal growth, the team found that the protein δ-catenin is also produced by cells in human blood vessels. By diminishing δ-catenin expression, the team disrupted vessel development, or angiogenesis, associated with inflammation in tumors and wounds. As expected, samples of human lung tumors expressed more δ-catenin than the surrounding tissues. And normal angiogenesis remained the same regardless of δ-catenin.

Because blocking δ-catenin stunts only inflammation-induced angiogenesis, the protein may be a promising anti-cancer target, says Charles Lin, an author on the study at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Tennessee.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Rockefeller University Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Laura M. DeBusk, Kimberly Boelte, Yongfen Min, and P. Charles Lin. Heterozygous deficiency of δ-catenin impairs pathological angiogenesis. Journal of Experimental Medicine, January 4, 2010 DOI: 10.1084/jem.20091097

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Rockefeller University Press. "Targeting cancerous vessels." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100104091128.htm>.
Rockefeller University Press. (2010, January 10). Targeting cancerous vessels. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100104091128.htm
Rockefeller University Press. "Targeting cancerous vessels." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100104091128.htm (accessed September 3, 2015).

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