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Archaeological 'time machine' greatly improves accuracy of early radiocarbon dating

Date:
February 11, 2010
Source:
Queen's University Belfast
Summary:
Researchers have produced a new archaeological tool which could answer key questions in human evolution. The new calibration curve, which extends back 50,000 years, is a major landmark in radiocarbon dating -- the method used by archaeologists and geoscientists to establish the age of carbon-based materials.

Professor Gerry McCormac and Dr Paula Reimer pictured in the 14 Chrono Centre at Queen's University Belfast. Staff at the Centre have been involved in the creation of a new calibration curve, which extends back 50,000 years.
Credit: Queen's University Belfast

Researchers at Queen's University have helped produce a new archaeological tool which could answer key questions in human evolution.

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The new calibration curve, which extends back 50,000 years, is a major landmark in radiocarbon dating -- the method used by archaeologists and geoscientists to establish the age of carbon-based materials.

It could help research issues including the effect of climate change on human adaption and migrations.

The curve called INTCAL09, has just been published in the journal Radiocarbon. It not only extends radiocarbon calibration but also considerably improves earlier parts of the curve.

Dr Ron Reimer of the Queen's School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology said: "The new radiocarbon calibration curve will be used worldwide by archaeologists and earth scientists to convert radiocarbon ages into a meaningful time scale comparable to historical dates or other estimates of calendar age.

"It is significant because this agreed calibration curve now extends over the entire normal range of radiocarbon dating, up to 50,000 years before today. Comparisons of the new curve to ice-core or other climate archives will provide information about changes in solar activity and ocean circulation."

It has taken nearly 30 years for researchers to produce a calibration curve this far back in time.

Since the early 1980s, an international working group called INTCAL has been working on the project.

The principle of radiocarbon dating is that plants and animals absorb trace amounts of radioactive carbon-14 from carbon dioxide in the atmosphere while they are alive but stop doing so when they die. The carbon-14 decays from archaeological and geological samples so the amount left in the sample gives an indication of how old the sample is.

As the amount of carbon -14 in the atmosphere is not constant, but varies with the strength of Earth's magnetic field, solar activity and ocean radiocarbon ages must be corrected with a calibration curve.

Most experts consider the technical limit of radiocarbon dating to be about 50,000 years, after which there is too little carbon-14 left to measure accurately with present day technology.

The project was led by Queen's University Belfast through a National Environment Research Centre (NERC) funded research grant to Dr Paula Reimer and Professor Gerry McCormac from the Centre for Climate, the Environment and Chronology (14CHRONO) at Queen's and statisticians at the University of Sheffield.

Ron Reimer and Professor Emeritus Mike Baillie from Queen's School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology also contributed to the work.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Queen's University Belfast. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Queen's University Belfast. "Archaeological 'time machine' greatly improves accuracy of early radiocarbon dating." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 February 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100211111549.htm>.
Queen's University Belfast. (2010, February 11). Archaeological 'time machine' greatly improves accuracy of early radiocarbon dating. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100211111549.htm
Queen's University Belfast. "Archaeological 'time machine' greatly improves accuracy of early radiocarbon dating." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100211111549.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

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