Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Targeting leukemia cell's gene 'addiction' presents new strategy for treatment

Date:
March 3, 2010
Source:
Wiley - Blackwell
Summary:
Scientists studying acute forms of leukemia have identified a new drug target to inhibit the genes which are vital for the growth of diseased cells. The research reveals how leukaemia cells become 'addicted' to genes, which if targeted could prevent diseased cells from developing.

An international team of scientists studying acute forms of leukemia have identified a new drug target to inhibit the genes which are vital for the growth of diseased cells. The research, reported in EMBO Molecular Medicine, reveals how leukemia cells become 'addicted' to genes, which if targeted could prevent diseased cells from developing.

The team, led by Dr Veronika Sexl from the University of Vienna, carried out their research on acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), which can both be caused by fusion protein, Bcr-Abl, created through the joining of two or more genes originally coded for separate proteins.

This joining of genes results in a complex tumor supporting 'network' which supports the growth and survival of the leukaemic cells. Inhibitor drugs such as 'Imatinib' can block vital signals and lead to leukemia cell death, but there are several mutations which can resist these inhibitors, making them ineffective.

As an alternative strategy the team investigated transcription factors Stat3 and Stat5 which are linked to bcr/abl-induced transformation. The team tested whether Stat3 and Stat5, acting downstream of Bcr-Abl are critical for leukemia maintenance and if they could be a alternative target for treatment.

"We developed a tumour-specific gene-deletion approach to analyse the roles of Stat5 and Stat3 in Bcr/Abl-induced leukemia growth," said Sexl. "We discovered that both factors are required for the development of Bcr-Abl, but once established only Stat5 is crucial for the survival and growth of leukemic Cells."

Even mutated forms of bcr-abl, leukemia cells, which are resistant to inhibiting drugs such as Imatinib, are still dependent on Stat5.

"Cancer cells undergo extensive adaptations in their signalling and metabolic pathways, thereby becoming dependent on certain genes," said Sexl. "In fact the activity of these genes can become limiting for a cancer cell."

The term 'Non-oncogene addication' (NOA) has been coined to describe this phenomenon of gene dependency and inhibiting these critical genes within the signalling network is predicted to cause system failure and halt the growth of leukemia cells.

"In this study we demonstrated that bcr-abl, leukemia cells are addicted to Stat5 to maintain the leukameic state, concluded Sexl. "We've identified Stat5 as an Achilles' heel in the signalling network downstream of Bcr-Abl. Thus, inhibition of Stat5 may provide a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of leukemia."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley - Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Andrea Hoelbl, Christian Schuster, Boris Kovacic, Bingmei Zhu, Mark Wickre, Maria A. Hoelzl, Sabine Fajmann, Florian Grebien, Wolfgang Warsch, Gabriele Stengl, Lothar Hennighausen, Valeria Poli, Hartmut Beug, Richard Moriggl, Veronika Sexl. Stat5 is indispensable for the maintenance of bcr/abl-positive leukaemia. EMBO Molecular Medicine, 2010; 2 (3): 98 DOI: 10.1002/emmm.201000062

Cite This Page:

Wiley - Blackwell. "Targeting leukemia cell's gene 'addiction' presents new strategy for treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100303082509.htm>.
Wiley - Blackwell. (2010, March 3). Targeting leukemia cell's gene 'addiction' presents new strategy for treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100303082509.htm
Wiley - Blackwell. "Targeting leukemia cell's gene 'addiction' presents new strategy for treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100303082509.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, April 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

'Holy Grail' Of Weight Loss? New Find Could Be It

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) In a potential breakthrough for future obesity treatments, scientists have used MRI scans to pinpoint brown fat in a living adult for the first time. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Little Progress Made In Fighting Food Poisoning, CDC Says

Newsy (Apr. 18, 2014) A new report shows rates of two foodborne infections increased in the U.S. in recent years, while salmonella actually dropped 9 percent. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

Obama: 8 Million Healthcare Signups

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) President Barack Obama gave a briefing Thursday announcing 8 million people have signed up under the Affordable Care Act. He blasted continued Republican efforts to repeal the law. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins