Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Genes linked to ulcerative colitis identified

Date:
March 18, 2010
Source:
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
A study of the human genome has now identified genes linked to ulcerative colitis, offering clues as to what causes the condition and potential avenues for new therapies to treat the disease.

A study of the human genome led by Cedars-Sinai researchers has now identified genes linked to ulcerative colitis, offering clues as to what causes the condition and potential avenues for new therapies to treat the disease.

Related Articles


The study, published in Nature Genetics, examined genes of nearly 13,000 patients to determine which parts of the genome are linked to ulcerative colitis. The study demonstrated more than 30 regions of the genome are connected to the risk of developing ulcerative colitis.

"This gives us a number of insights into the disease," said Dermot P.B. McGovern, M.D., Ph.D., director of Translational Medicine for the Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and primary author of the paper. "An increased understanding of the genetics gives us some insight into what causes ulcerative colitis and will potentially help us identify new therapies for ulcerative colitis."

Understanding the genetics of the disease may also explain why the condition varies so much from patient to patient in severity, symptoms and response to therapies. In turn, said McGovern, this can lead to a more personalized approach to treating ulcerative colitis patients. For example, in addition to more effectively matching currently available medications to patients, the study may help identify entirely new avenues for research, enabling doctors to develop new treatments for ulcerative colitis.

Ulcerative colitis, one of the most common types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease or IBD, is a chronic digestive disorder. An estimated 1.4 million Americans have IBD, and about 30,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Ulcerative colitis causes inflammation and ulcers in the top layers of the lining of the large intestine. The most common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea and bleeding from the rectum. Patients may also experience fatigue, weight loss and loss of appetite. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic relapsing condition with periods of remission interspersed with flares of disease, although about 10 percent of ulcerative colitis patients have symptoms chronically. Patients with ulcerative colitis can be at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer.

The study was a collaborative effort between the Inflammatory Bowel and Immunobiology Research Institute and The Medical Genetics Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases IBD Genetics Consortium, the Genome Institute of Singapore, the Karolinksak Institutet in Sweden, the Swedish National Program for IBD genetics, The Swedish Organisation for Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, and Harvard Medical School.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. McGovern et al. Genome-wide association identifies multiple ulcerative colitis susceptibility loci. Nature Genetics, 2010; DOI: 10.1038/ng.549

Cite This Page:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Genes linked to ulcerative colitis identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100317091303.htm>.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. (2010, March 18). Genes linked to ulcerative colitis identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100317091303.htm
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Genes linked to ulcerative colitis identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100317091303.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins