Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Brightest galaxies tend to cluster in busiest parts of universe, study finds

Date:
October 11, 2010
Source:
University of California - Irvine
Summary:
For more than a decade, astronomers have been puzzled by bright galaxies in the distant universe that appear to be forming stars at phenomenal rates. What prompted the prolific star creation, they wondered. And what kind of spatial environment did these galaxies inhabit?

For more than a decade, astronomers have been puzzled by bright galaxies in the distant universe that appear to be forming stars at phenomenal rates. What prompted the prolific star creation, they wondered. And what kind of spatial environment did these galaxies inhabit?

Related Articles


Now, using a super-sensitive camera/spectrometer on the Herschel Space Observatory, astronomers -- including a UC Irvine team led by Asantha Cooray -- have mapped the skies as they appeared 10 billion years ago.

The UCI scientists discovered that these glistening galaxies preferentially occupy regions of the universe containing more dark matter and that collisions probably caused the abundant star production.

"Thanks to the superb resolution and sensitivity of the SPIRE [Spectral & Photometric Imaging Receiver] instrument on Herschel, we managed to map in detail the spatial distribution of massively star-forming galaxies in the early universe," said Cooray, associate professor and Chancellor's Fellow in physics & astronomy. "All indications are that these galaxies are . . . crashing, merging and possibly settling down at centers of large dark-matter halos."

This information will enable scientists to adapt conventional theories of galaxy formation to accommodate the strange, star-filled versions.

The European Space Agency's Herschel observatory carries the largest astronomical telescope operating in space today; it collects data at far-infrared wavelengths invisible to the naked eye.

One of three cameras on Herschel, SPIRE has let Cooray and colleagues survey large areas of the sky -- about 60 times the size of the full moon -- in the constellations of Ursa Major and Draco. The UCI team also included Alexandre Amblard, project scientist in physics & astronomy; Paolo Serra, postdoctoral fellow; and physics students Ali Khostovan and Ketron Mitchell-Wynne.

The data analyzed in this study was among the first to come from the Herschel Multi-Tiered Extragalactic Survey, the space observatory's largest project. UCI is one of only four U.S. educational institutions involved in Herschel using the SPIRE instrument. Seb Oliver, a University of Sussex professor who leads the survey, called the findings exciting.

"It's just the kind of thing we were hoping for from Herschel," he said, "and was only possible because we can see so many thousands of galaxies. It will certainly give the theoreticians something to chew over."

The study will appear in a special issue of Astronomy & Astrophysics dedicated to the first scientific results from Herschel. The project will continue to collect images over larger areas of the sky in order to build up a more complete picture of how galaxies have evolved and interacted over the past 10 billion years.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Irvine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. Cooray, A. Amblard, L. Wang, V. Arumugam, R. Auld, H. Aussel, T. Babbedge, A. Blain, J. Bock, A. Boselli, V. Buat, D. Burgarella, N. Castro-Rodriguez, A. Cava, P. Chanial, D. L. Clements, A. Conley, L. Conversi, C. D. Dowell, E. Dwek, S. Eales, D. Elbaz, D. Farrah, M. Fox, A. Franceschini, W. Gear, J. Glenn, M. Griffin, M. Halpern, E. Hatziminaoglou, E. Ibar, K. Isaak, R. J. Ivison, A. A. Khostovan, G. Lagache, L. Levenson, N. Lu, S. Madden, B. Maffei, G. Mainetti, L. Marchetti, G. Marsden, K. Mitchell-Wynne, A. M. J. Mortier, H. T. Nguyen, B. O'Halloran, S. J. Oliver, A. Omont, M. J. Page, P. Panuzzo, A. Papageorgiou, C. P. Pearson, I. Perez Fournon, M. Pohlen, J. I. Rawlings, G. Raymond, D. Rigopoulou, D. Rizzo, I. G. Roseboom, M. Rowan-Robinson, B. Schulz, D. Scott, P. Serra, N. Seymour, D. L. Shupe, A. J. Smith, J. A. Stevens, M. Symeonidis, M. Trichas, K. E. Tugwell, M. Vaccari, I. Valtchanov, J. D. Vieira, L. Vigroux, R. Ward, G. Wright, C. K. Xu, M. Zemcov. HerMES: Halo occupation number and bias properties of dusty galaxies from angular clustering measurements. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 2010; 518: L22 DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201014597

Cite This Page:

University of California - Irvine. "Brightest galaxies tend to cluster in busiest parts of universe, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100520141240.htm>.
University of California - Irvine. (2010, October 11). Brightest galaxies tend to cluster in busiest parts of universe, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100520141240.htm
University of California - Irvine. "Brightest galaxies tend to cluster in busiest parts of universe, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100520141240.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Space & Time News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Spokesman: 'NORAD Ready to Track Santa'

Spokesman: 'NORAD Ready to Track Santa'

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said that NORAD is ready to track Santa Claus as he delivers gifts next week. Speaking tongue-in-cheek, he said if Santa drops anything off his sleigh, "we've got destroyers out there to pick them up." (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
NASA's Planet-Finding Kepler Mission Isn't Over After All

NASA's Planet-Finding Kepler Mission Isn't Over After All

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) More than a year after NASA declared the Kepler spacecraft broken beyond repair, scientists have figured out how to continue getting useful data. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rover Finds More Clues About Possible Life On Mars

Rover Finds More Clues About Possible Life On Mars

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) NASA's Curiosity rover detected methane on Mars and organic compounds on the surface, but it doesn't quite prove there was life ... yet. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Evidence of Life on Mars? NASA Rover Finds Methane, Organic Chemicals

Evidence of Life on Mars? NASA Rover Finds Methane, Organic Chemicals

Reuters - US Online Video (Dec. 16, 2014) NASA's Mars Curiosity rover finds methane in the Martian atmosphere and organic chemicals in the planet's soil, the latest hint that Mars was once suitable for microbial life. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins