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Mechanism for link between high fat diet and risk of prostate cancer and disorders unveiled

Date:
July 16, 2010
Source:
Case Western Reserve University
Summary:
Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men, and diet is considered one of the most important controllable risk factors for inflammation and prostate diseases including benign prostatic hyperplsia (BPH), prostatitis, and prostate cancer. A new study sheds light on the mechanisms of the deleterious effects of a high fat diet on the prostate.

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men with an estimated 192,280 new cases diagnosed in the US in 2009. Diet is considered one of the most important controllable risk factors for inflammation and prostate diseases including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis, and prostate cancer.

Sanjay Gupta, MS, PhD, Carter Kissell associate professor & research director in the Department of Urology and associate professor in the Department of Nutrition in the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, and his team of post-doctoral fellows have focused on understanding the mechanisms of the deleterious effects of a high fat diet on the prostate. Previously, Dr. Gupta's team demonstrated that nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a protein complex that controls DNA transcription which is activated as a result of inflammation and stress, is constitutively activate in human prostate adenocarcinoma and is related to tumor progression (Shukla S et al, Neoplasia, 2004).

In a new study published in the journal The Prostate, Dr. Gupta and his team demonstrate that a high fat diet results in activation of NF-κB in the abdominal cavity, thymus, spleen, and prostate. Non-obese NF-κB reporter mice were fed a high fat diet for four, eight, and 12 weeks. Compared with mice fed a regular diet, the high fat diet group had significant increases in prostate weight, and in the prostate expression of markers of oxidative stress (such as NADPH), and inflammation (such as the downstream targets of NF-κB: nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase [COX-2]) were increased. These studies provide direct evidence that a high fat diet causes proliferation, inflammation, and oxidative stress that can lead to benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis, and cancer of the prostate, some of the most common disorders affecting adult men.

"Our studies provide evidence that a high-fat diet increases the activation of NF-κB along with elevated levels of NADPH oxidase components which might lead to intraprostatic inflammation. This study strengthens the link between a high-fat diet -- typical of "Western style" high fat diet -- as a potential cause of prostatic diseases including BPG and prostate cancer," said Dr. Gupta.

This work was supported by grants from the National Cancer Institute, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and the Sullivan Foundation for the Study of Prostatitis.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Case Western Reserve University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Eugene V. Vykhovanets, Eswar Shankar, Olena V. Vykhovanets, Sanjeev Shukla, Sanjay Gupta. High-fat diet increases NF-κB signaling in the prostate of reporter mice. The Prostate, 2010; DOI: 10.1002/pros.21230

Cite This Page:

Case Western Reserve University. "Mechanism for link between high fat diet and risk of prostate cancer and disorders unveiled." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714151751.htm>.
Case Western Reserve University. (2010, July 16). Mechanism for link between high fat diet and risk of prostate cancer and disorders unveiled. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714151751.htm
Case Western Reserve University. "Mechanism for link between high fat diet and risk of prostate cancer and disorders unveiled." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714151751.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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