Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New collaborative process can help improve management of marine recreational fisheries

Date:
September 21, 2010
Source:
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Summary:
In an era when fisheries management is rife with controversy, new research by fisheries scientists shows that a new, stakeholder-driven process can improve the way we manage fisheries targeted by commercial and recreational interests. The team has documented how this process resulted in more content stakeholders and more conservative harvest measures for the king mackerel fishery in the Southeast US.

In an era when fisheries management is rife with controversy, new research led by a team of University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science fisheries scientists shows that a new, stakeholder-driven process can improve the way we manage fisheries targeted by both commercial and recreational interests.

Related Articles


In the September issue of the journal Fisheries, the team documents how this innovative process resulted in more content stakeholders while implementing more conservative harvest measures for the king mackerel fishery in the Southeast United States.

The "FishSmart" program works with a wide diversity of fishery stakeholders to develop a set of protective harvest measures agreeable to recreational anglers, conservation organizations, commercial fishermen and managers. Unlike the traditional fisheries management process in which the views of stakeholders are considered after harvest limits have been proposed, the FishSmart process involves the stakeholders from the outset to come to consensus on a shared vision of a "successful fishery" for the target species.

"By developing recommendations for the king mackerel fishery in the southeast Atlantic, our research shows that this process can work in our nation's more contentiously managed fisheries," said lead researcher Dr. Thomas Miller of the UMCES Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. "As one of the top ten marine recreational species in the nation, king mackerel is heavily targeted by both commercial and recreational interests. There is a lot at stake when developing management plans for this important species."

Over an eight-month period, the stakeholders used a model developed in collaboration with the research team to weigh how alternative management regulations would impact the fishery. The stakeholders recommended three specific approaches involving changes in size and bag limits to the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council. All of the workgroup's recommendations were more conservative than those developed by the Council's own deliberative process.

"By first deciding on the ultimate goal -- a healthy and sustainable fishery -- stakeholder groups are better able to understand how changes in management measures are able to both protect the anglers' interests and the long-term health of the species," said Chesapeake Biological Laboratory fisheries biologist and co-author Dr. Michael Wilberg. "FishSmart encourages stakeholders to come to consensus on a set of management measures that protect the fish and are agreeable to everyone at the table."

"FishSmart clearly shows that when management gives stakeholders the tools and responsibility of making decisions, they can and will work to ensure the long term sustainability of a fishery," Miller added.

The FishSmart project is supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and represents a next-generation approach to managing our nation's fisheries.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Miller. FishSmart: An Innovative Role for Science in Stakeholder-Centered Approaches to Fisheries Management. Fisheries, 2010; 35 (9): 424 DOI: 10.1577/1548-8446-35.9.422

Cite This Page:

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. "New collaborative process can help improve management of marine recreational fisheries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100921143924.htm>.
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. (2010, September 21). New collaborative process can help improve management of marine recreational fisheries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100921143924.htm
University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. "New collaborative process can help improve management of marine recreational fisheries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100921143924.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

After Sony Hack, What's Next?

After Sony Hack, What's Next?

Reuters - US Online Video (Dec. 19, 2014) The hacking attack on Sony Pictures has U.S. government officials weighing their response to the cyber-attack. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Spokesman: 'NORAD Ready to Track Santa'

Spokesman: 'NORAD Ready to Track Santa'

AP (Dec. 19, 2014) Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said that NORAD is ready to track Santa Claus as he delivers gifts next week. Speaking tongue-in-cheek, he said if Santa drops anything off his sleigh, "we've got destroyers out there to pick them up." (Dec. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Navy Unveils Robot Fish

Reuters - Light News Video Online (Dec. 18, 2014) The U.S. Navy unveils an underwater device that mimics the movement of a fish. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins