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Hong Kong hospital reports possible airborne influenza transmission

Date:
November 22, 2010
Source:
Infectious Diseases Society of America
Summary:
Researchers have examined an influenza outbreak in a Hong Kong hospital and the possible role of aerosol transmission.

Direct contact and droplets are the primary ways influenza spreads. Under certain conditions, however, aerosol transmission is possible. In a study published in the current issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, available online, the authors examined such an outbreak in their own hospital in Hong Kong.

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On April 4, 2008, seven inpatients in the hospital's general medical ward developed fever and respiratory symptoms. Ultimately, nine inpatients exhibited influenza-like symptoms and tested positive for influenza A. The cause of the outbreak was believed to be an influenza patient who was admitted on March 27. He received a form of non-invasive ventilation on March 31, and was then moved to the intensive care unit after 16 hours. During that time, he was located right beside the outflow jet of an air purifier, which created an unopposed air current across the ward.

"We showed that infectious aerosols generated by a respiratory device applied to an influenza patient might have been blown across the hospital ward by an imbalanced indoor airflow, causing a major nosocomial outbreak," said study author Nelson Lee, MD, of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. "The spatial distribution of affected patients was highly consistent with an aerosol mode of transmission, as opposed to that expected from droplet transmission.

"Suitable personal protective equipment, including the use of N95 respirators, will need to be considered when aerosol-generating procedures are performed on influenza patients," Dr. Lee added. "Avoiding such procedures in open wards and improving ventilation design in health care facilities may also help to reduce the risk of nosocomial transmission of influenza."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Infectious Diseases Society of America. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. BonnieC.K. Wong, Nelson Lee, Yuguo Li, PaulK.S. Chan, Hong Qiu, Zhiwen Luo, RaymondW.M. Lai, KarryL.K. Ngai, DavidS.C. Hui, K.W. Choi, IgnatiusT.S. Yu. Possible Role of Aerosol Transmission in a Hospital Outbreak of Influenza. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2010; 51 (10): 1176 DOI: 10.1086/656743

Cite This Page:

Infectious Diseases Society of America. "Hong Kong hospital reports possible airborne influenza transmission." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101122121711.htm>.
Infectious Diseases Society of America. (2010, November 22). Hong Kong hospital reports possible airborne influenza transmission. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101122121711.htm
Infectious Diseases Society of America. "Hong Kong hospital reports possible airborne influenza transmission." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101122121711.htm (accessed March 2, 2015).

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