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Red wine compound increases anti-tumor effect of rapamycin

Date:
February 14, 2011
Source:
Lerner Research Institute
Summary:
Researchers have discovered that resveratrol -- a compound found in red wine -- when combined with rapamycin can have a tumor-suppressing effect on breast cancer cells that are resistant to rapamycin alone. The research also indicates that the PTEN tumor-suppressing gene contributes to resveratrol's anti-tumor effects in this treatment combination.

Researchers from Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute have discovered that resveratrol -- a compound found in red wine -- when combined with rapamycin can have a tumor-suppressing effect on breast cancer cells that are resistant to rapamycin alone.

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The research -- recently published in Cancer Letters -- also indicates that the PTEN tumor-suppressing gene contributes to resveratrol's anti-tumor effects in this treatment combination.

Charis Eng, MD, Ph.D., Chair of the Genomic Medicine Institute of Cleveland Clinic's Lerner Research Institute, led her team to study the effect of combining resveratrol, a chemopreventive drug found in many natural compounds, with rapamycin on breast cancer cells. The research demonstrates an additive effect between these two drugs on breast cancer cell signaling and growth.

"Rapamycin has been used in clinical trials as a cancer treatment. Unfortunately, after a while, the cancer cells develop resistance to rapamycin," Eng said. "Our findings show that resveratrol seems to mitigate rapamycin-induced drug resistance in breast cancers, at least in the laboratory. If these observations hold true in the clinic setting, then enjoying a glass of red wine or eating a bowl of boiled peanuts -- which has a higher resveratrol content than red wine -- before rapamycin treatment for cancer might be a prudent approach."

Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant drug used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation, has been considered for the use of anti-tumor activity against breast cancer. Resveratrol is a type of polyphenol that is found in the skin of red grapes and is a constituent of red wine, and has been considered for multiple uses regarding cellular therapies.

Despite the potential for tumor suppression, rapamycin's efficacy with respect to growth inhibition differs markedly among various breast cancer cell lines. The effect of resveratrol and rapamycin, alone and in combination, on cell growth of three human breast cancer cell lines was assessed. Rapamycin, resveratrol, and combinations of these agents inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. In all three cell lines tested, the presence of low concentrations of resveratrol and rapamycin was sufficient to induce 50 percent growth inhibition. Although relatively early, these observations may suggest resveratrol as a powerful integrative medicine adjunct to traditional chemotherapy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Lerner Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Xin He, Yu Wang, Jinhong Zhu, Mohammed Orloff, Charis Eng. Resveratrol enhances the anti-tumor activity of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in multiple breast cancer cell lines mainly by suppressing rapamycin-induced AKT signaling. Cancer Letters, 2011; 301 (2): 168 DOI: 10.1016/j.canlet.2010.11.012

Cite This Page:

Lerner Research Institute. "Red wine compound increases anti-tumor effect of rapamycin." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110214142335.htm>.
Lerner Research Institute. (2011, February 14). Red wine compound increases anti-tumor effect of rapamycin. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110214142335.htm
Lerner Research Institute. "Red wine compound increases anti-tumor effect of rapamycin." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110214142335.htm (accessed April 25, 2015).

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