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Body mass index and risk of death in Chinese population

Date:
March 7, 2011
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
Chinese people with a body mass index of 24-25.9 had the lowest risk of death, according to a new study.

Chinese people with a body mass index (BMI) of 24-25.9 had the lowest risk of death, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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Obesity has increased significantly across the globe and the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 2.3 billion adults will be overweight and more than 700 million will be obese by 2015. Overweight and obesity are associated with increased risks of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases.

As white populations have served as the benchmark for definitions of overweight and obesity, the WHO has suggested a lower cut-off for overweight and obesity in Chinese populations.

This study, by researchers from Taiwan and the US, looked at 58 738 Chinese men and 65 718 women in Taiwan aged 20 or older to find the association between BMI and risk of death from any cause. They found that people with a BMI of less than 24 with a chronic disease were at higher risk than those without a chronic disease. Smokers with lower BMIs had a higher risk of death. People with a chronic disease and a higher BMI (above 30) had a lower risk of death.

The lowest risk of death was among men and women with a BMI of 24-25.9, compared with white populations in which the lowest risk has been reported among people with a BMI of 22.5-24.9.

"The risk of death was higher among people with BMIs in the lower and upper categories than among those with BMIs in the middle category," writes Dr. Wen-Yuan Lin, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, with coauthors.

"The findings from our primary analysis and sensitivity analyses are consistent with the results of [other] studies and do not support the use of a lower BMI cutoff value for overweight and obesity in the adult Chinese population," state the authors.

In a related commentary, Dr. Shankuan Zhu, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, and coauthors write "the findings in the study by Lin and colleagues are important because they seem to challenge the current definitions of overweight and obesity and are inconsistent with the pattern found in white populations and for the relation between BMI and chronic diseases, in particular cardiovascular diseases."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Wen-Yuan Lin, Shin-Li Tsai, Jeanine B. Albu, Cheng-Chieh Lin, Tsai-Chung Li, F. Xavier Pi-Sunyer, Pei-Kun Sung and Kuo-Chin Huang. Body mass index and all-cause mortality in a large Chinese cohort. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2011; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.101303
  2. Shankuan Zhu, Xiaoguang Ma, and Jin-Ling Tang. What is the optimal body mass index for Chinese people? Canadian Medical Association Journal, 2011; DOI: 10.1503/cmaj.110142

Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Body mass index and risk of death in Chinese population." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110307124513.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2011, March 7). Body mass index and risk of death in Chinese population. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110307124513.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Body mass index and risk of death in Chinese population." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110307124513.htm (accessed April 1, 2015).

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