Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Making viruses pass for 'safe'

Date:
March 21, 2011
Source:
American Institute of Physics
Summary:
Viruses can penetrate every part of the body, making them potentially good tools for gene therapy or drug delivery. But with our immune system primed to seek and destroy these foreign invaders, delivering therapies with viruses is currently inefficient and can pose a significant danger to patients.

Viruses can penetrate every part of the body, making them potentially good tools for gene therapy or drug delivery. But with our immune system primed to seek and destroy these foreign invaders, delivering therapies with viruses is currently inefficient and can pose a significant danger to patients.

Now scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have engineered a virus with potential to solve this problem. They describe the new virus March 8 at the 55th Annual Biophysical Society Meeting in Baltimore, MD.

"We would like to find a way to avoid the immune system and maximize the dose delivered to a tumor or diseased tissue," explains professor Dennis Discher of the University of Pennsylvania. He and his colleagues have created a lentiviral vector that expresses CD47, the "marker of self" protein, on its surface. The protein gives cells a free license from macrophages, the immune system's policemen.

"This marker of self protein is found on all of our cells and tames our immune system," says Discher, senior study author. Discher explains that every cell is like a driver. A macrophage 'policeman' pulls each cell over at a traffic stop and checks its drivers license -- the marker protein. "The policeman says go on if it's valid. If not, then the macrophage eats you," he says.

By tagging CD47 with green fluorescent protein, the team confirmed that the engineered virus, which is hundreds of times smaller than human cells, was carrying the marker of self. "Assessing the expression of the protein on the surface of an individual virus has been a real biophysical challenge, addressed with a combination of single molecule fluorescence methods and atomic force microscopy," says lead author Nisha Sosale, a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania.

In cell culture experiments in the laboratory, the engineered virus passed inspection and was eaten less frequently by macrophages. "It looks like, by engineering the viral surface, we have made the viruses look like self," says Discher.

This work was funded by the National Institutes of Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Institute of Physics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Institute of Physics. "Making viruses pass for 'safe'." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110308141053.htm>.
American Institute of Physics. (2011, March 21). Making viruses pass for 'safe'. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110308141053.htm
American Institute of Physics. "Making viruses pass for 'safe'." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110308141053.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

CDC Revamps Ebola Guidelines After Criticism

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new protocols for healthcare workers interacting with Ebola patients. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

WHO: Ebola Vaccine Trials to Start a in January

AP (Oct. 21, 2014) Tens of thousands of doses of experimental Ebola vaccines could be available for "real-world" testing in West Africa as soon as January as long as they are deemed safe in soon to start trials, the World Health Organization said Tuesday. (Oct. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

First-Of-Its-Kind Treatment Gives Man Ability To Walk Again

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) A medical team has for the first time given a man the ability to walk again after transplanting cells from his brain onto his severed spinal cord. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

CDC Issues New Ebola Guidelines for Health Workers

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 21, 2014) The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins