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Rare alpine insect may disappear with glaciers

Date:
April 5, 2011
Source:
United States Geological Survey
Summary:
Loss of glaciers and snowpack due to climate warming in alpine regions is putting pressure on a rare aquatic insect -- the meltwater stonefly, according to a new study.

Meltwater Stonefly (Lednia tumana).
Credit: Joe Giersch, U.S. Geological Survey

Loss of glaciers and snowpack due to climate warming in alpine regions is putting pressure on a rare aquatic insect, the meltwater stonefly, according to a study recently released in Climatic Change Letters.

In the study, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Montana, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service illustrate that alpine aquatic insects can be good early warning indicators of climate warming in mountain ecosystems. The glaciers in Glacier National Park are predicted to disappear by 2030 and, as its name infers, the meltwater stonefly (Lednia tumana) prefers to live in the coldest, most sensitive alpine stream habitats directly downstream of disappearing glaciers, permanent snowfields and springs in the park.

"Our simulation models suggest that climate change threatens the potential future distribution of these sensitive habitats and the persistence of the meltwater stonefly through the loss of glaciers and snowfields," said Clint Muhlfeld, project leader and USGS scientist. "These major habitat reductions imply a greatly increased probability of extinction and/or significant range contraction for this sensitive species."

The meltwater stonefly has been petitioned for listing under the U.S. Endangered Species Act because it is at risk of becoming extinct due to the melting of the glaciers in Glacier National Park.

"This isn't just about an obscure insect that most people will never see--it's about an entire threatened ecosystem which harbors a whole suite of rare, poorly known, native species- the biology and survival of which are dependent on very cold water," said Joe Giersch, USGS scientist and co-author of the study.

More information about impacts of climate change on rare aquatic insects can be found on the USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center website at: http://nrmsc.usgs.gov/research/lednia


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by United States Geological Survey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Clint C. Muhlfeld, J. Joseph Giersch, F. Richard Hauer, Gregory T. Pederson, Gordon Luikart, Douglas P. Peterson, Christopher C. Downs, Daniel B. Fagre. Climate change links fate of glaciers and an endemic alpine invertebrate. Climatic Change, 2011; DOI: 10.1007/s10584-011-0057-1

Cite This Page:

United States Geological Survey. "Rare alpine insect may disappear with glaciers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110405093658.htm>.
United States Geological Survey. (2011, April 5). Rare alpine insect may disappear with glaciers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110405093658.htm
United States Geological Survey. "Rare alpine insect may disappear with glaciers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110405093658.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

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