Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cryoablation used to successfully treat atrial fibrillation in Canada

Date:
May 11, 2011
Source:
Montreal Heart Institute
Summary:
The electrophysiology team at the Montreal Heart Institute used cryoablation (ablation using cold) to treat a patient suffering from atrial fibrillation, the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia, and one associated with significant morbidity. This was a first in Canada following the approval of the Arctic Front device by Health Canada.

The electrophysiology team at the Montreal Heart Institute (MHI) used cryoablation (ablation using cold) to treat a patient suffering from atrial fibrillation, the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia, and one associated with significant morbidity. The procedure was performed by Dr. Peter Guerra, Chief of Electrophysiology, and Dr. Marc Dubuc, cardiologist and specialist in electrophysiology. This was a first in Canada following the approval of the Arctic Front device by Health Canada.

Related Articles


A Canadian technique using cold as a new form of energy

The patient, a 71 year old man, had suffered from arrhythmia for a number of years, and medications had been ineffective, so a catheter procedure was therefore necessary. He responded favourably to the procedure.

The Arctic Front device was developed in Montreal and is manufactured by Medtronic. Using this new tool, the Montreal Heart Institute cardiologists can treat the patient more quickly and efficiently, compared to the traditional heat ablation. As a result, the risks of complication associated with this treatment, including the risk of recurrence is reduced significantly. "Cryoballoon technology is a major improvement over the traditional approach for the treatment of atrial fibrillation," said Dr. Dubuc, who is also an associate professor of Medicine at the Université de Montréal. "The delivery of circumferential lesions around the pulmonary veins reduces the duration of the procedure while being effective and safe for the patient."

A technology developed at the Montreal Heart Institute

The STOP AF (Sustained Treatment of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation) study, demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the Arctic Front device in treating and eradicating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. "We are pleased with the success we obtained using cryoablation in the North American trial STOP AF and our patients have done extremely well. Now, at last, we can offer this technology to all our patients," said Dr. Guerra, who is assistant professor of Medicine at the Université de Montréal and who was lead investigator at the Montreal Heart Institute for the STOP AF trial. "Since cryoablation was pioneered by my colleague, Marc Dubuc, and our Research Center, we are obviously anxious to move forward with this new tool."

The STOP AF trial showed that 69.9% of patients treated with Arctic Front were free from atrial fibrillation at one year, compared to 7.3% of patients treated with drug therapy only. The study also demonstrated that treatment with the device is safe, with limited procedure‐related adverse events (3.1%), and patients enrolled in the study displayed a significant reduction of symptoms, a decrease in the use of drug therapy and substantial improvements in both physical and mental quality-of-life factors.

A cardiac disease that affects one person in 20

It is estimated that one person in 20 will suffer from atrial fibrillation in his/her lifetime. In Canada, roughly 250,000 persons suffer from this form of arrhythmia. The main symptoms of atrial fibrillation are palpitations, dizziness and shortness of breath. The heart begins to beat very quickly, irregularly and unpredictably. Its effect is to weaken the heart and promote the formation of blood clots that can cause a stroke as well as peripheral embolism. Up to ten years ago, atrial fibrillation was treated only with medications, but since 1997, radiofrequency ablation using heat has been used in patients who did not respond to conventional treatment with pills.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Montreal Heart Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Montreal Heart Institute. "Cryoablation used to successfully treat atrial fibrillation in Canada." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511081238.htm>.
Montreal Heart Institute. (2011, May 11). Cryoablation used to successfully treat atrial fibrillation in Canada. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511081238.htm
Montreal Heart Institute. "Cryoablation used to successfully treat atrial fibrillation in Canada." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511081238.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 1, 2015) — A rehabilitation robot prototype to help restore deteriorated nerves and muscles using electromyography and computer games. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) — A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) — An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) — A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins