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Atmospheric carbon dioxide buildup unlikely to spark abrupt climate change, scientists find

Date:
June 20, 2011
Source:
University of Washington
Summary:
New research lends support to recent studies that suggest abrupt climate change is the result of alterations in ocean circulation uniquely associated with ice ages, not from atmospheric carbon dioxide.

New research lends support to recent studies that suggest abrupt climate change is the result of alterations in ocean circulation uniquely associated with ice ages, not from atmospheric carbon dioxide.
Credit: ProMotion / Fotolia

There have been instances in Earth history when average temperatures have changed rapidly, as much as 10 degrees Celsius (18 degrees Fahrenheit) over a few decades, and some have speculated the same could happen again as the atmosphere becomes overloaded with carbon dioxide.

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New research lends support to evidence from numerous recent studies that suggest abrupt climate change appears to be the result of alterations in ocean circulation uniquely associated with ice ages.

"There might be other mechanisms by which greenhouse gases may cause an abrupt climate change, but we know of no such mechanism from the geological record," said David Battisti, a University of Washington atmospheric sciences professor.

Battisti was part of a team that used a numerical climate model coupled with an oxygen-isotope model to determine what caused climate shifts in a computer-generated episode that mimicked Heinrich events during the last ice age, from 110,000 to 10,000 years ago. Heinrich events produced huge numbers of North Atlantic Ocean icebergs that had broken off from glaciers.

The simulations showed the sudden increase in North Atlantic sea ice cooled the Northern Hemisphere, including the surface of the Indian Ocean, which reduced rainfall over India and weakened the Indian monsoon.

Battisti noted that while carbon dioxide-induced climate change is unlikely to be abrupt, the impacts of changing climate could be.

"When you lose a keystone species, ecosystems can change very rapidly," he said. "Smoothly retreating sea ice will cause fast warming if you live within a thousand kilometers of the ice. If warming slowly dries already semi-arid places, fires are going to be more likely."

Previous studies of carbonate deposits from caves in China and India are believed to show the intensity of monsoon precipitation through the ratio of specific oxygen isotopes. The modeling the scientists' used in the current study reproduced those isotope ratios, and they determined that the Heinrich events were associated with changes in the intensity of monsoon rainfall in India rather than East Asia.

The research is published online June 19 by Nature Geoscience. The lead author is Franceso Pausata of the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research in Norway. Besides Battisti, other co-authors are Kerim Nisancioglu of UNI Research in Norway and Cecilia Bitz of the UW.

The work was funded by the Norwegian Research Council and the U.S. National Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Washington. The original article was written by Vince Stricherz, News and Information. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Francesco S. R. Pausata, David S. Battisti, Kerim H. Nisancioglu, Cecilia M. Bitz. Chinese stalagmite δ18O controlled by changes in the Indian monsoon during a simulated Heinrich event. Nature Geoscience, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1169
  2. Kathleen R. Johnson. Palaeoclimate: Long-distance relationship. Nature Geoscience, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1190

Cite This Page:

University of Washington. "Atmospheric carbon dioxide buildup unlikely to spark abrupt climate change, scientists find." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110620094555.htm>.
University of Washington. (2011, June 20). Atmospheric carbon dioxide buildup unlikely to spark abrupt climate change, scientists find. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110620094555.htm
University of Washington. "Atmospheric carbon dioxide buildup unlikely to spark abrupt climate change, scientists find." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110620094555.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

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