Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Predicting locations for deer vs. car collisions

Date:
June 30, 2011
Source:
University of Alberta
Summary:
Researchers have produced a map of Edmonton, in the western Canadian province of Alberta, predicting the most likely locations where vehicles will collide with deer. These collisions can be fatal for drivers and their passengers. The hot spots for deer vs. vehicle collisions virtually encircle Edmonton along the city limit, border line.

University of Alberta researchers have produced a map of Edmonton, in the western Canadian province of Alberta, predicting the most likely locations where vehicles will collide with deer. These collisions can be fatal for drivers and their passengers. The hot spots for deer vs. vehicle collisions virtually encircle Edmonton along the city limit, border line.

Related Articles


Mark Boyce is a U of A ecologist and co author of the paper. Boyce found that the most dangerous rural roadways share three features; Natural vegetation, bushes and trees, run right up to the roadside, the roads pass through a landscape of farm fields and forests and the final factor, speed limits are high.

The researchers analyzed data from 260 deer, vehicle collisions in the Edmonton area between 2003 and 2007. Across Canada the cost of vehicle collisions with animals like deer and moose is $300 million a year.

When heavy vegetation runs right up to the roadway drivers don't have a chance to avoid a deer popping out of nowhere. The solution is to groom natural vegetation along busy rural roads, creating a buffer zone where drivers can see grazing and approaching animals.

Boyce says the mix of agriculture land alongside sheltered, forest areas is the perfect habitat for deer. Deer venture out of the forest in the morning and evening for easily accessible food. The researchers say agriculture and wildlife management policies that reduce the number of predators and strict policing of poaching laws has been a boon to the deer population across North America.

The conflict comes when urban expansion results in more traffic moving through prime, rural real estate for deer.

Boyce says now that the highest deer -- vehicle collision locations around Edmonton are known the solution is to cut back natural vegetation along the roads, reduce speed through these hot zones and improve the signage alerting drivers to deer crossings.

The research was led by U of A PhD candidate Rob Found. It was published in the Journal of Environmental Management.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Alberta. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rob Found, Mark S. Boyce. Predicting deer–vehicle collisions in an urban area. Journal of Environmental Management, 2011; DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2011.05.010

Cite This Page:

University of Alberta. "Predicting locations for deer vs. car collisions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110630131826.htm>.
University of Alberta. (2011, June 30). Predicting locations for deer vs. car collisions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110630131826.htm
University of Alberta. "Predicting locations for deer vs. car collisions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110630131826.htm (accessed March 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, March 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Amazon Complains U.S. Is Too Slow To Regulate Drones

Amazon Complains U.S. Is Too Slow To Regulate Drones

Newsy (Mar. 25, 2015) Days after getting approval to test certain commercial drones, Amazon says the Federal Aviation Administration is dragging its feet on the matter. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone Use Changing Our Brain and Thumb Interaction, Say Researchers

Smartphone Use Changing Our Brain and Thumb Interaction, Say Researchers

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 25, 2015) European researchers say our smartphone use offers scientists an ideal testing ground for human brain plasticity. Dr Ako Ghosh&apos;s team discovered that the brains and thumbs of smartphone users interact differently from those who use old-fashioned handsets. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
China Wants to Export Its Steel Problem

China Wants to Export Its Steel Problem

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 25, 2015) China is facing a crisis with a glut of steel and growing public anger over the pollution created by production. In a move to solve the problem, some steel mills are looking to relocate overseas. Jane Lanhee Lee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Stays on Its Feet Despite Punishment

Robot Stays on Its Feet Despite Punishment

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 24, 2015) Robotic engineers have modelled a two-legged robot to be fast and agile like an ostrich. The design is more efficient and stable than bipedal robots built to move like humans, according to its creators who abuse the poor machine to test its skills. Ben Gruber has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins