Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Climbing the social ladder seems to lessen high blood pressure risk

Date:
July 11, 2011
Source:
BMJ-British Medical Journal
Summary:
Social mobility -- upwards -- seems to curb the risk of developing high blood pressure among those born on the lower rungs of the ladder, suggests new research.

Social mobility -- upwards -- seems to curb the risk of developing high blood pressure among those born on the lower rungs of the ladder, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Related Articles


Being born into poor or disadvantaged backgrounds has been linked with an increased risk of high blood pressure, which is a known contributory factor to an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

The authors wanted to see if that risk was affected by climbing up the social ladder across generations.

They used data from the Swedish Twin Registry to track adult and parental socioeconomic status among 12,000 same sex twins born between 1926 and 1958. This entailed a postal survey in 1973 on health and lifestyle and a telephone interview conducted between 1998 and 2002 as part of the Screening Across the Lifespan Study (SALT).

Questions included any treatment for high blood pressure, and parental occupations were obtained from birth records, which routinely contain this type of information.

Rates of high blood pressure were higher both among adults in low socioeconomic groups and among those whose parents were in one of these groups. Blood pressure rates were also higher among those who had been of a low weight at birth and those who weighed more, were of short stature, and who drank more.

Overall, low socioeconomic status was associated with a 42% increased risk of high blood pressure. Among adults, only women of low socioeconomic status were at greater risk.

But compared with those who stayed on the lower rungs of the social ladder across two generations, the upwardly mobile enjoyed an almost 20% reduction in their risk of high blood pressure. And those who fell further down the social ladder were at increased risk compared with those whose social mobility remained constant on the upper rungs.

The findings held true, irrespective of other familial factors, prompting the authors to conclude that the risk of high blood pressure associated with being born into a deprived background can be modified by social status in later life.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by BMJ-British Medical Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lovisa Hφgberg, Sven Cnattingius, Cecilia Lundholm, Pδr Sparιn, Anastasia N Iliadou. Intergenerational social mobility and the risk of hypertension. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2011; DOI: 10.1136/jech.2010.130567

Cite This Page:

BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Climbing the social ladder seems to lessen high blood pressure risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110711195015.htm>.
BMJ-British Medical Journal. (2011, July 11). Climbing the social ladder seems to lessen high blood pressure risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110711195015.htm
BMJ-British Medical Journal. "Climbing the social ladder seems to lessen high blood pressure risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110711195015.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins