Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New discovery brings customized tuberculosis therapies based on genotype closer to reality

Date:
August 4, 2011
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Are you genetically predisposed to tuberculosis? Scientists may now be able to answer this question and doctors may be able to adjust their therapeutic approach based on what they learn. That's because new research suggests that two frequent mutations in an immune system gene called TLR1 are responsible cellular changes that ultimately make us less likely to resist the disease.

Are you genetically predisposed to tuberculosis? Scientists may now be able to answer this question and doctors may be able to adjust their therapeutic approach based on what they learn. That's because new research presented in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that two frequent mutations in an immune system gene called TLR1 are responsible for cellular changes that ultimately make us less likely to resist the disease.

"The study may help to characterize individuals with increased susceptibility to tuberculosis, which might result in faster and more effective recognition and therapy of this disease," said Lothar Rink, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Institute of Immunology at RWTH Aachen University Hospital in Aachen, Germany. "We hope that our results have implications for understanding the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections associated with TLR1."

To make this discovery, scientists tested 71 healthy individuals and found that about half lacked the toll like receptor 1 (TLR1) proteins necessary for the immune system to adequately recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using specific TLR1 agonists, researchers found that cells without TLR1 (TLR-negative) showed a decreased functionality when compared to cells with TLR1 (TLR-positive). Sequencing and genotyping of TLR1-positive and TLR1-negative cells from healthy individuals revealed that lack of TLR1 surface expression accompanied by impaired function was strongly associated with increased susceptibility to tuberculosis. Further studies are needed to confirm that a TLR1-negative genotype accounts for hyporesponsiveness to mycobacterial infections or for tuberculosis vaccination.

"Antibiotics have been helpful in managing tuberculosis in the developed world," said John Wherry, Ph.D., Deputy Editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, "but unfortunately, these treatments are expensive, take a long time and are becoming less effective against drug-resistant strains. Understanding why some people are more likely than others to become infected should help prioritize who should receive drug treatment in the developing world and lead to strategies for universal vaccines or therapeutics."

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tuberculosis one-third of the world's population are infected with TB, with more than 9 million people around the world becoming sick with tuberculosis each year. Nearly 2 million people die from tuberculosis each year worldwide. In the United States, there were 11,545 tuberculosis cases reported in 2009. The bacteria that cause tuberculosis usually attack the lungs, but they can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, tuberculosis can be fatal. The disease is spread through the air from one person to another. The bacteria that cause the disease are put into the air when a person with active tuberculosis of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. People nearby may breathe in these bacteria and become infected.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. Uciechowski, H. Imhoff, C. Lange, C. G. Meyer, E. N. Browne, D. K. Kirsten, A. K. Schroder, B. Schaaf, A. Al-Lahham, R. R. Reinert, N. Reiling, H. Haase, A. Hatzmann, D. Fleischer, N. Heussen, M. Kleines, L. Rink. Susceptibility to tuberculosis is associated with TLR1 polymorphisms resulting in a lack of TLR1 cell surface expression. Journal of Leukocyte Biology, 2011; 90 (2): 377 DOI: 10.1189/jlb.0409233

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "New discovery brings customized tuberculosis therapies based on genotype closer to reality." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801111740.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2011, August 4). New discovery brings customized tuberculosis therapies based on genotype closer to reality. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801111740.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "New discovery brings customized tuberculosis therapies based on genotype closer to reality." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110801111740.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins