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Puffins 'scout out' best migration route

Date:
August 8, 2011
Source:
University of Oxford
Summary:
Individual Atlantic puffins 'scout out' their own migration routes rather than relying on genetic 'programming' or learning routes from a parent, a new study suggests.

Puffins on land.
Credit: Chris Perrins

Individual Atlantic puffins 'scout out' their own migration routes rather than relying on genetic 'programming' or learning routes from a parent, a new study suggests.

The evidence comes from research by a team from Oxford University and Microsoft Research Cambridge which used BAS geolocater tags to track the migration movements of 18 birds: with 8 of these birds being tracked for two consecutive years.

A report of the research appears in this week's PLoS ONE.

The study found that the birds followed a wide range of different migration routes (suggesting their movements were not genetically predetermined) but that they were not merely random as the same bird followed a similar route each year. Because young puffins leave colonies at night, alone, long before their parents, the idea that they might learn a route directly from others also seems extremely unlikely.

'We think it's likely that, before they start breeding, young puffins explore the resources the ocean has to offer and come up with their own individual, often radically different, migration routes,' said Professor Tim Guilford of Oxford University's Department of Zoology, who co-led the study. 'This tendency to explore may enable them to develop a route which exploits all the best food sources in a particular area wherever these might happen to be.'

The team believe this kind of 'scouting' for good migration routes could also be used by many other species of birds, especially seabirds -- which can choose to stop and feed anywhere on the ocean during their migration.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Oxford. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Tim Guilford, Robin Freeman, Dave Boyle, Ben Dean, Holly Kirk, Richard Phillips, Chris Perrins. A Dispersive Migration in the Atlantic Puffin and Its Implications for Migratory Navigation. PLoS ONE, 2011; 6 (7): e21336 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021336

Cite This Page:

University of Oxford. "Puffins 'scout out' best migration route." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110804215759.htm>.
University of Oxford. (2011, August 8). Puffins 'scout out' best migration route. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110804215759.htm
University of Oxford. "Puffins 'scout out' best migration route." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110804215759.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

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