Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Plants could pave the way for new ovarian cancer treatments

Date:
August 25, 2011
Source:
University of Strathclyde
Summary:
Tropical plants may contain the basis of new and effective treatments for ovarian cancer, according to new research.

Professor Ian Cree with the Perkin Elmer Janus MDT Robot (the equipment used to conduct the trial).
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Strathclyde

Tropical plants may contain the basis of new and effective treatments for ovarian cancer, according to researchers at the Universities of Strathclyde and Portsmouth.

The scientists are developing a programme for testing plant extracts for the ability to stop cells from ovarian tumours growing. In initial tests, several plant extracts killed the tumour samples, taken from cancer patients.

The extracts are complex mixtures of many different chemicals but ingredients in the plants could be used as starting points for new medicines to tackle the disease. The scientists are now planning further investigation of the most promising compounds.

Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women, affecting more than 6,500 in the UK alone each year. It is also one of the most deadly, killing more than 4,000 women in the UK annually, despite survival rates nearly doubling in the past 30 years. The research is an example of the pioneering work of the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences in developing new medicines for illnesses and conditions including infectious diseases, cancer, heart disease, and schizophrenia. An 8 million fundraising campaign is underway for the Institute's new 36 million building, to expand and enhance its innovative research and education in medicine discovery, development and use.

Alan Harvey, Professor of Pharmacology at Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, said: "Ovarian cancer's inherent danger to women's health is compounded by the fact that it is notoriously difficult to detect. The disease's high death rates urgently need to be dealt with through safe and potent new treatments.

"Our collection of natural plant samples gives us a broad range of possibilities for treatment and we have had good results from many plants. A great many samples have been studied in our collaboration with Portsmouth and a lot of activity has been detected that wouldn't have been picked up in conventional tests.

"The high throughput screening in the method we have used has produced a high return and we are hoping that more tests will bring new treatments a step closer."

Ian Cree, Professor of Histopathology, Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences at Portsmouth's Institute of Biomedical and Biomolecular Science and Director of the Cancer Laboratory at Queen Alexandra Hospital, said: "This is a first -- no one has managed to use cells obtained directly from cancers to screen an entire library of plant extracts and we are very excited by the results obtained.

"The key now will be to obtain further funding to produce drugs from those samples showing that they can kill cancer cells.

"It should be remembered that drug development is a very lengthy process and that these results, though exciting, are a long way from being used in patients."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Strathclyde. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Strathclyde. "Plants could pave the way for new ovarian cancer treatments." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 August 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110825090239.htm>.
University of Strathclyde. (2011, August 25). Plants could pave the way for new ovarian cancer treatments. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110825090239.htm
University of Strathclyde. "Plants could pave the way for new ovarian cancer treatments." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/08/110825090239.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Herman Goldman has worked at the same lighting store for almost 75 years. Find out his secrets to a happy, productive life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Nancy Writebol, an American missionary who contracted Ebola, is apparently getting better, according to her husband. The outbreak, however, is not. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins