Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Starving inflammatory immune cells slows damage caused by multiple sclerosis, study finds

Date:
September 2, 2011
Source:
University of California - San Diego
Summary:
Researchers report that inhibiting the ability of immune cells to use fatty acids as fuel measurably slows disease progression in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS).

In a paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, a pair of researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences report that inhibiting the ability of immune cells to use fatty acids as fuel measurably slows disease progression in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Related Articles


MS is an autoimmune disease resulting from damage to the myelin sheath, a protective layer surrounding nerve cells. When the sheath is damaged, nerve impulses are slowed or halted, resulting in progressive physical and neurological disabilities. The cause of the damage is inflammation occurring when the body's immune cells attack the central nervous system (CNS).

Marianne Manchester, PhD, professor of pharmacy and first author Leah P. Shriver, PhD, looked at how immune cells in the CNS oxidize fatty acids for energy when their preferred fuel source -- glucose -- is in short supply, which may occur in inflamed tissues. In a mouse model mimicking chronic MS, Manchester and Shriver discovered that by inhibiting a single enzyme that helps immune cells effectively exploit fatty acids, the cells eventually starved and died, preventing further inflammatory damage.

Currently, no approved drug or therapy for MS targets fatty acid metabolism. And the specificity of the target -- inhibiting a single enzyme -- suggests that adverse side effects associated with existing treatments, such as increased infection risk, is unlikely.

"We expect that because immune cells not in lesions in the CNS are able to use available glucose, they will function just fine during infection and that inhibition of this pathway would not produce general immune suppression," Shriver said.

The enzyme-inhibitor used by Manchester and Shriver in their study is a drug already tested in humans with congestive heart failure, and was generally well-tolerated. The scientists are now using mass spectrometry to determine whether their results in the mouse model are translatable to humans. "We are interested in determining how this pathway is utilized in human tissue samples from MS patients," Manchester said.

Funding for this study came from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - San Diego. The original article was written by Scott LaFee. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Leah P. Shriver, Marianne Manchester. Inhibition of fatty acid metabolism ameliorates disease activity in an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Scientific Reports, 2011; DOI: 10.1038/srep00079

Cite This Page:

University of California - San Diego. "Starving inflammatory immune cells slows damage caused by multiple sclerosis, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110901142627.htm>.
University of California - San Diego. (2011, September 2). Starving inflammatory immune cells slows damage caused by multiple sclerosis, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110901142627.htm
University of California - San Diego. "Starving inflammatory immune cells slows damage caused by multiple sclerosis, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110901142627.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Just A Half-Hour Of Lost Sleep Could Lead To Weight Gain

Just A Half-Hour Of Lost Sleep Could Lead To Weight Gain

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) A new study found losing just half an hour of sleep could make you gain weight. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) According to a report from the CDC, suicide rates among young women increased from 1994 to 2012 while rates among young men have decreased. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins