Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Repeated use of ophthalmic antibiotics among patients undergoing intraocular injection therapy linked to antimicrobial resistance

Date:
September 12, 2011
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Repeated exposure of the eye to ophthalmic antibiotics appears to be associated with the emergence of resistant strains of microbes among patients undergoing intraocular injection therapy for neovascular retinal disease, according to a new study.

Repeated exposure of the eye to ophthalmic antibiotics appears to be associated with the emergence of resistant strains of microbes among patients undergoing intraocular injection therapy for neovascular retinal disease, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Related Articles


According to background information in the article, more than 8 million people in the United States are affected by age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness among individuals older than 65 years in this country. Treating the neovascular or "wet" form of the disease involves monthly injections of medication into the eye; this treatment is also being studied for eye problems related to diabetes and retina vein occlusions (obstructions of veins carrying blood from the retina). To prevent the most severe complication from intraocular injection, endophthalmitis (inflammation inside the eye), ophthalmologists routinely prescribe ophthalmic antibiotics after every injection. "Repeated exposure of ocular flora [microbes living on or inside the body], however, may select for resistant bacterial strains and cultivate 'superbugs' with multiple-drug resistance that may considerably affect the treatment of ocular infections," write the authors.

Stephen J. Kim, M.D., and Hassanain S. Toma, M.D., from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tenn., conducted a randomized, controlled, longitudinal study of 48 eyes of 24 patients who, in one eye each, received intraocular injection. At baseline and after every injection, researchers obtained cultures of the conjunctiva (the membrane of the eye's surface and the inner eyelid) for both treated and untreated (control) eyes. Patients were randomized to one of four antibiotics and after each injection used only the antibiotic they were assigned. The researchers tested the bacterial samples for susceptibility to 16 antibiotics and analyzed the bacterial DNA. Injections were administered every four weeks for at least four consecutive months, and patients were followed for one year.

Repeated exposure to fluoroquinolone antibiotics was associated with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) that demonstrated significantly increased rates of resistance to both older- and newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Repeated exposure to azithromycin was associated with CNS that demonstrated significantly increased resistance to macrolides and decreased resistance to both older- and newer-generation fluoroquinolones. Specimens of CNS from treated eyes demonstrated significant increases in multiple-drug resistance; for example, 81.8 percent of CNS specimens appeared resistant to at least three antibiotics, and 67.5 percent appeared resistant to at least five antibiotics.

The researchers suggest that their results demonstrate rapid development of resistance from CNS to certain antibiotics, and that this resistance is maintained when the antibiotic is periodically readministered. "This finding has considerable implications because conjunctival flora are presumed to be the predominant source of postinjection endophthalmitis," they write, adding that research suggests one strain of CNS is associated with greater intraocular inflammation than are strains more susceptible to antibiotics. "Our findings," the authors conclude, "indicate the need for more judicious use of ophthalmic antibiotics after intraocular injection to reduce the potential emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. J. Kim, H. S. Toma. Antimicrobial Resistance and Ophthalmic Antibiotics: 1-Year Results of a Longitudinal Controlled Study of Patients Undergoing Intravitreal Injections. Archives of Ophthalmology, 2011; 129 (9): 1180 DOI: 10.1001/archophthalmol.2011.213

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Repeated use of ophthalmic antibiotics among patients undergoing intraocular injection therapy linked to antimicrobial resistance." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912164028.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, September 12). Repeated use of ophthalmic antibiotics among patients undergoing intraocular injection therapy linked to antimicrobial resistance. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912164028.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Repeated use of ophthalmic antibiotics among patients undergoing intraocular injection therapy linked to antimicrobial resistance." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912164028.htm (accessed April 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Plants & Animals News

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

Dispute Flares Over Controversial Thai Temple Tigers

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) Thai wildlife officials begin a headcount of nearly 150 tigers kept by monks at a temple which has become the centre of a dispute over the welfare of the animals. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
College Kegger: University Gets in on Craft Brew

College Kegger: University Gets in on Craft Brew

AP (Apr. 24, 2015) Theres never been a shortage of beer on college campuses. But students at Cal Poly-Pomona are learning how to brew, serving their product to classmates, and hoping to land jobs in craft breweries when they graduate. (April 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cambodian Butterflies Help Villagers Make a Living

Cambodian Butterflies Help Villagers Make a Living

AFP (Apr. 24, 2015) Cambodia&apos;s Banteay Srey Butterfly Centre is the largest of its kind in Southeast Asia. As well as educating tourists about the creatures, it also offers a source of income to nearby villagers, who are paid to breed local species. Duration: 02:04 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
3D Food Printing: The Meal of the Future?

3D Food Printing: The Meal of the Future?

AP (Apr. 23, 2015) Developers of 3D food printing hope the culinary technology will revolutionize the way we cook and eat. (April 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Plants & Animals

Earth & Climate

Fossils & Ruins

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins