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Knockout of protein prevents colon tumor formation in mice

Date:
September 30, 2011
Source:
University of Illinois at Chicago
Summary:
A protein that regulates differentiation in normal tissue may play a very different role in colon and breast cancer, activating proliferation of damaged cells, according to researchers.

A protein that regulates cell differentiation in normal tissue may play a different role in colon and breast cancer, activating proliferation of damaged cells, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine.

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The protein, called PTK6, is found in normal skin and gut cells -- and in cancerous, but not normal, breast tissue.

"Our research has primarily focused on the normal function of this protein in the gut, where it regulates growth and differentiation," said Angela Tyner, professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics.

Epithelial cells, such as skin cells and the cells that line the colon, turn over rapidly. To replace them, new cells must be continuously produced that become specialized, or differentiated, to perform specific functions.

To further their investigation of PTK6, Tyner and her colleagues developed a mouse that lacked the PTK6 gene. Based on their observation of increased growth in the intestine, Tyner's group suspected that mice lacking PTK6 would be more susceptible to cancer.

Using a carcinogen, the researchers induced colon tumors resembling human sporadic colon cancer in mice lacking the PTK6 gene and in normal mice.

"Mice lacking PTK6 were highly resistant to the carcinogen and developed fewer tumors," Tyner said. "It was an unexpected result."

Tyner and her colleagues were able to establish the reason for this unexpected result. They found that PTK6 was activating a protein responsible for turning genes on and off called STAT3. Previous studies have established a role for STAT3 in proliferation and found that it plays an important role in many epithelial cancers, including skin cancer and colon cancer.

PTK6 seems to be playing opposite roles in normal and cancer cells, Tyner said.

"We believe that PTK6 may play a role in initiation of cancer in the colon, but we don't yet know what role PTK6 may play in metastasis."

Tyner's laboratory is continuing to investigate the role of PTK6 in cancer, which may provide a future target for therapies not only for colon cancer but breast cancer as well.

The study, published in Gastroenterology, was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the American Gastroenterological Association. Jessica Gierut was the study's first author, and Yu Zheng, Wenjun Bie, Robert Carroll, Susan Ball-Kell and Andrea Haegebarth also contributed to the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Illinois at Chicago. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jessica Gierut, Yu Zheng, Wenjun Bie, Robert E. Carroll, Susan Ball-Kell, Andrea Haegebarth, Angela L. Tyner. Disruption of the Mouse Protein Tyrosine Kinase 6 Gene Prevents STAT3 Activation and Confers Resistance to Azoxymethane. Gastroenterology, 2011; DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2011.06.071

Cite This Page:

University of Illinois at Chicago. "Knockout of protein prevents colon tumor formation in mice." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929161341.htm>.
University of Illinois at Chicago. (2011, September 30). Knockout of protein prevents colon tumor formation in mice. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929161341.htm
University of Illinois at Chicago. "Knockout of protein prevents colon tumor formation in mice." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110929161341.htm (accessed March 2, 2015).

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