Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Earlier tracheostomies result in better patient outcomes, study finds

Date:
October 6, 2011
Source:
Penn State
Summary:
A tracheostomy performed within the first seven days after a severe head injury results in better overall patient outcome, according to new research. This is especially true for patients who have a greater chance of surviving when admitted to the hospital.

A tracheostomy performed within the first seven days after a severe head injury results in better overall patient outcome, according to a team of Penn State College of Medicine researchers. This is especially true for patients who have a greater chance of surviving when admitted to the hospital.

A tracheostomy is an opening created in the front of the neck directly into the trachea to allow unimpeded breathing. (A tracheotomy is the act of making that opening.)

"The CDC estimates that more than 200,000 individuals are hospitalized annually for traumatic brain injury," said Kevin M. Cockroft, M.D., associate professor, neurosurgery. "Severely head-injured patients, particularly those with additional injuries, often require tracheostomy at some point during their hospital stay."

Previous studies have shown mixed results.

"Traditionally, tracheostomy, or 'trach,' has been recommended to prevent airway complications," Cockroft said. "Early trach has been advocated as a means to improve outcome, with various studies suggesting that it may decrease the incidence of pneumonia, reduce intensive care unit days and shorten overall length of stay. Some evidence also exists to suggest that early trach does not improve outcomes. As a result, the timing of trach in these critically ill patients remains controversial."

Early trach patients are defined as those who have a tracheostomy performed during the first seven hospital-stay days. Late trach patients are defined as those who have a tracheostomy performed at greater than seven days after admission.

Researchers used data collected from January 1990 through December 2005 by the Pennsylvania Trauma Society Foundation for its statewide trauma registry. Because of a lack of patients with only head injury, researchers looked at patients with injury to at least one other body system. In total, 3,104 patients were included in the study, with 1,577 in the early trach group and 1,527 in the late trach group. It is the largest study to date to report the effects of tracheostomy timing on outcome after a severe head injury.

In the study population, later trach patients were in the hospital three times longer than early trach patients and also spent an average of four times longer in the ICU. Early trach patients were 1.5 times more likely to be discharged in an independent state. However, later trach patients were twice as likely to live to be discharged from the hospital, potentially because more severe cases would receive an earlier trach.

In addition, later trach patients were about twice as likely to suffer from an adverse pulmonary occurrence such as pneumonia, about 1.5 times as likely to suffer a cardiac event such as a heart attack, and 1.5 times more likely to have an infection.

Researchers reported their results in the journal Neurocritical Care. The project was funded by the Departments of Neurosurgery and Public Health Sciences, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center and Penn State College of Medicine.

"These results indicate a complex relationship between tracheostomy timing and outcome, but suggest that a strategy of early tracheostomy, particularly when performed on patients with a reasonable chance of survival, results in a better overall clinical outcome than when the tracheostomy is performed in a delayed manner," Cockroft said.

Other researchers are Elias B. Rizk and Akshal S. Patel, Department of Neurosurgery; Christina M. Stetter and Vernon M. Chinchilli, Department of Public Health Sciences.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Penn State. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elias B. Rizk, Akshal S. Patel, Christina M. Stetter, Vernon M. Chinchilli, Kevin M. Cockroft. Impact of Tracheostomy Timing on Outcome After Severe Head Injury. Neurocritical Care, 2011; DOI: 10.1007/s12028-011-9615-7

Cite This Page:

Penn State. "Earlier tracheostomies result in better patient outcomes, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111005111355.htm>.
Penn State. (2011, October 6). Earlier tracheostomies result in better patient outcomes, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111005111355.htm
Penn State. "Earlier tracheostomies result in better patient outcomes, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111005111355.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Might Not Be Out Of Control In U.S., But Coverage Is

Ebola Might Not Be Out Of Control In U.S., But Coverage Is

Newsy (Oct. 2, 2014) Coverage of the lone Ebola patient discovered in Texas has U.S. media in a frenzy — but does the coverage match the reality? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Rhode Island Child With Enterovirus Dies After Infection

Rhode Island Child With Enterovirus Dies After Infection

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 2, 2014) A Rhode Island child hospitalized with Enterovirus D68 has died of a bacterial infection, in what state public health officials say was an unusual and dangerous combination. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
US Hunts Contacts of Ebola Patient, Including Children

US Hunts Contacts of Ebola Patient, Including Children

AFP (Oct. 2, 2014) Health officials in Texas on Wednesday scoured the Dallas area for people, including schoolchildren, who came in contact with a Liberian man who was diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Says Losing Sense Of Smell Can Indicate Death

Study Says Losing Sense Of Smell Can Indicate Death

Newsy (Oct. 2, 2014) Researchers found elderly adults with a poor sense of smell are more likely to die within five years. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins